Moderators: Random Orbital Bob, nev, CHJ, Noel, Charley

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By CHJ
#658461
paulm wrote:......Chas, looked more perfect beads than I could manage by hand ....


Me too Paul, purchase came about after I had spent several hours practicing turning reasonable beads for a job that needed a fair quantity of identical looking beads in close proximity, decided that one lot of aggro worrying about making a slip and having to start the job again again was enough.

Now I just pick up a tool and only have to worry about the wood performance not my ability to get it wrong.
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By CHJ
#658873
This one may have to have a change of lid, the Yew rim is rather brash at the moment and the light angles make the Ash in the lid look rather dark. May just wait a while and see if the Yew darkens with light exposure or until an obvious colour match presents itself for a new lid.
DSCN3122.JPG
DSCN3123.JPG


Yew, Ash & Walnut 160mm diam.
By Wood spoiler
#660733
By the numbers of these you produce you make them look so easy and they are always immaculately presented. Although I havn't commented on your submissions for a while I always look at your items and find your output inspirational and instructive.

I tried a bowl with similar techniques but was not happy as I had issues with the different grains and directions, so my question is how do you overcome the conflicts of grain direction and cutting cleanly
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By CHJ
#660829
Wood spoiler wrote:I tried a bowl with similar techniques but was not happy as I had issues with the different grains and directions, so my question is how do you overcome the conflicts of grain direction and cutting cleanly


On the turning/finishing front I rarely get any problems with change of grain direction across the segments, sharp tools are essential and always aim to perform a slicing cut as opposed to a chopping cut so that grain pulling is reduced to a minimum, if I get a patch of fluffy grain such as with the elm I am currently turning I wet the patch with sealer and shear cut or even shear scrape, always with a freshly tuned up cutting edge.

Also when finishing, be prepared to sand with the lathe stationary and sand with the grain in any particularly spot, should you be unfortunate to have torn a small splinter out in something like open pored side grain Oak or pulled the odd end fibre try wet sanding with sealer, often the natural filling that takes place is not obtrusive and can be let stand rather than continually chasing a lost cause.

Only you can determine if the fill is acceptable but more times than you would think the blend is undetectable when finished.
By boysie39
#662155
Chas, looking at the first two pictures I get the effect of looking into a basket, as if the dark pieces were spacers with nothing in between . beautifully made .
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By CHJ
#662233
Well at least in your eyes Eugene I've achieved the "Basket" shape requested, with a bit of imagination in real life the Ash with the dark dust grain infill does look a little basket weave-esqe.
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By Hesh
#662633
Another good day in the workshop, I particularly like the work on the bases of the last few. Always enjoy this thread so keep them coming please.

Steve
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By CHJ
#662642
Hesh wrote:..... I particularly like the work on the bases of the last few. Always enjoy this thread so keep them coming please.

Steve


I find the bead base ring the quickest method of finishing the bases, it's become my norm as it means that I can be lazy and not have to think about the tooling and holding methods and gives me a quick finishing session.

Brittle open grain woods like the Oak need care and sharp tools but pre-treatment just prior to cutting can overcome breakouts and in use failures.