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By Sawdust=manglitter
#1200069
Can you guess what’s coming up next...

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The next phase is here. As per recommendations on here I bought a relatively cheap knurling tool from Chronos. The tool posts I have for the wood lathe don’t have a square surface, so also needed to make myself a simple tool rest for a square reference surface.

So bought a 25mm diameter mild steel bar and also a 25mm square mild steel bar from the bay. So started by sawing down both bars to size, which took a while. For now I decided just to bolt them together with M12 bolts, so was straightforward enough.

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So did the same with the square bar (but obviously not on the lathe)

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So I now have a square surface to clamp the knurling tool to.

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Started off just turning it by hand to see what happens, ended up trying with the lathe at low speed.

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I’m so pleased with my first attempt experiment.

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When I get time I will be making some brass knobs from scratch for the router plane :D
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By Sawdust=manglitter
#1201913
So I’ve finished the height adjustment knob!

I started with a 1.5” brass rod from ebay. I placed this between the jaws of my wood lathe in order to drill a hole as close to the centre as possible. This hole is 5mm diameter in order to tap it for M6 x 1.0.

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So once the hole was drilled i then tapped the hole for M6. I then mounted this on some scrap M6 threaded rod and placed this in a drill chuck on the lathe. I did use an old lathe centrein the other side of the hole for stability to stop as much chatter as possible. As per Chas’ recommendations I then (cautiously) tried using a wood lathe parting tool, and was plesently surprised as to how well it cut and the tool didn’t get too hot and start ruining the tempering, which I was worried about. Using a combination of the parting tool and a round nose scraper I slowly removed the waste to a shape I was happy with. Then I knurled the grippy part. (sorry not many in-between photos, I was “in the zone”)

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Whilst turning this I had to re-tighten the drill chuck a few times and then it occurred to me, ‘what if I’ve crushed some of the threads of the threaded rod making this knob off centre’? Thankfully it turned out to be not too bad, but when it came to shaping the top ‘dome’ shape it was a little wobbly, so decided the best bet would be to get hold of a part threaded M6 bolt, as below, which I trimmed to fit as much length as I can in the drill chuck.

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I’m glad I got the above as it did help keep it stable when turning the end of the dome with without a support. Once I was happy with the shape overall I then sanded from 320 grit up to 3200 micromesh.

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Oh, and I used a hacksaw to cut a small reference indicator line, so when using the router plane I can take mental note of where my the indicator line is for the first cut and then know that each full turn is 1mm.

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In order to locate the height adjuster so it can reach both front and rear blade locations I clamped 2 blade body’s to the plane. I sanded a point to the end of the M6 threaded rod, which I could protrude slightly from the bottom of the adjustment knob and mark the new location of the threaded bar.

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I filled the 2 exisitng holes with epoxy.

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I do plan on shaping a brass plate to go over the top to cover the unsightly filled holes, so that’s the next job before drilling the new hole.
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By custard
#1201919
Sawdust=manglitter wrote:I'm still surprised with what you can actually get done on a wood lathe!!! I will certainly be doing more brass work in future, and I am no metal-worker


That's astonishing, and it opens the door for drawer pulls and all sorts of stuff on a woodworking lathe.

Do you know what type of brass you used? I've heard that there are dozens of different types and grades of wood, and apparently they can have quite different properties.
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By Sawdust=manglitter
#1201922
custard wrote:That's astonishing, and it opens the door for drawer pulls and all sorts of stuff on a woodworking lathe.

Do you know what type of brass you used? I've heard that there are dozens of different types and grades of wood, and apparently they can have quite different properties.


All of the brass I've bought has been in small quantities on ebay and the cheapest I can find, and they all say that it is CZ121 which i assume is the grade or purity. I never looked into it to be honest, i just took a punt on the cheapest available to me to try it out. But as you've said, my limited experience working with brass has now opened doors for future projects :D
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By Sawdust=manglitter
#1201926
From a quick search...

Brass Classes
Brasses are divided into two classes. The alpha alloys, with less than 37% zinc, and the alpha/beta alloys with 37-45% zinc. Alpha alloys are ductile and can be cold worked. Alpha/beta or duplex alloys have limited cold ductility and are harder and stronger. CZ121 is an alpha/beta alloy.

Brass alloy CZ121 is used for machining. It has lead added to the composition to improve machinability. The lead remains insoluble in the microstructure of the brass and the soft particles act as chip breakers.

https://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=2822
By AES
#1201960
+1 for what "he" said about HSS tools on brass! I'm VERY impressed with the above metal turning on a wood lathe BTW. EXCELLENT looking results and something to be proud off. Makes me feel a little less "guilty" about the small amount of wood turning that I do on a metal lathe!

AES
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By CHJ
#1203237
Another use for your Knurling tool, if you have jigs or wooden lathe spindle jigs requiring regular relocation.

Make up some simple Brass or Aluminium centre inserts to mount in them, that way it doesn't matter how many times you remount or re-locate they will run true. Just did these this morning for some Test turnings and sample use.
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By Sawdust=manglitter
#1204095
Update... i finally got around to doing the brass plate to the top, so rough cut with a hacksaw then filed away to size.

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I scuffed up and used a punch to knock some ‘dents’ to the underside of the brass plate in the hopes to help the brass bond with the epoxy and then glued it on and shaped further using files.

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I still need to sand/polish it up properly, but other projects are priority at the moment. But as a whole the plane functions perfectly!! Just been using it on some half blind dovetails on this sideboard/TV cabinet i’ve been making, and its been so satisfying to use.

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By AES
#1204112
VERY impressive Sawdust=manglitter. IMO your metal working skills are a perfect match to your woody skills. Very well done Sir!

=D> =D>

AES