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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 14:03 
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Hmmmmm, intriguing!? When I was thinking about it I didnt think I'd have a stable enough support for the knurling tool, especially as my lathe is only a cheap-ish Delta clone of the Axminster AWVSL1000 so prone to slight movement of the headstock. If I had something solid like a Graduate lathe then I would've taken a punt and given it a go. Have you, or anyone else, tried using a knurling tool on brass on a (not so solid) wood lathe?


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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 15:09 
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Not exactly, but I have used that sort of tool on my treadle powered Barnes metalwork lathe. It's the clamping that makes the knurling happen - I just pull the workpiece round by hand. As long as you can clamp the knurling tool so it can't escape forward, you're ok. You might be able to just clamp one alongside a short toolrest turned 90° . The height it sits at takes care of itself. With the ingenuity shown in this build, I'm sure if you bought one you'd find a way to mount it.

(My one has a longer shaft for a different tool post, which might be easier to mount, so check the models before you buy one.

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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 15:13 
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There are very few forces involved other than holding the tool rigid as per your normal tool rest, all significant forces are between the two cutting wheels.

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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 15:56 
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I made up an oddball tool post some years ago, not used often but it's surprising what you can bolt or clamp to it for that unexpected job.
Attachment:
post.JPG
post.JPG [ 175.1 KiB | Viewed 278 times ]

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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 19:48 
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Ooooh, that looks like it would be very handy indeed for random odd-jobs! That’ll be added to my ever growing to-do list, thanks for the tip. May consider trying the knurling myself then when I get a chance to make improvements to this plane :)


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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 19:56 
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Back to the WIP...

In the meantime I’d bought a couple of the Veritas router plane blades, so I had them for accurate sizing. For the depth stop I bought a short length of 22mm diameter brass rod from eBay. So as there was a lot of experimentation during this build I thought I’d try and drill a hole into the rod using the wood lathe, so I mounted the rod in my chuck using the centre of the jaws to secure the rod (hopefully) central. I then drilled a small hole (maybe 4mm) and then worked up from 6mm to 8mm and finally to a 10mm diameter hole - also used 3 in 1 for lubrication, rightly or wrongly!

Image

Once I drilled the hole I did a little shaping of what would be the top face of the depth stop using a file while the lathe was on. The i sanded it using the micro-grit pads.

In order to cut it off, again rightly or wrongly, I carefully moved a hacksaw forwards while the lathe was on in order to cut the correct length almost all the way through, but tuned off when I was close to actually saw the rest off with the hacksaw properly. Note that I found it a cleaner/slower/less scary cut with the teeth of the hacksaw blade facing the wrong way.

I cleaned up the burrs to the bottom face of the depth stop using sand paper, working my way through the grits by rubbing on my table saw table, and even went through the micro-grit pads to an unnecessary 12000 grit.

I have some cheapy small files which I randomly received among random tools that came with my lathe, which I used to try to form internal corners of the hole in the depth stop to try and make a nicely fitting square hole the right size for the Veritas blades, which took a while.
[As a side note, I bought a second cut and smooth cut Bahco 10mm square files (which are great by the way!) for this and for making the V-groove in the body, but I wish I’d gone for the 8mm square files as the 10mm files were too big to use effectively until the hole was already big enough for the depth stop, so I was only able to use the top tapered area of the files.]
Anyway, got there in the end and then drilled and tapped a hole for an M4 knurled bolt (which I got here... https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07 ... UTF8&psc=1 - again, a lot more than I need, but will no doubt come in handy for future projects in years to come)

Image

As you can tell from the above and below photos, the hole isn’t the tidiest and was actually a little too big/loose for my liking as it wobbled to either side of the knurled bolt a bit when tightened(so would be too inaccurate for me as a depth stop), so this was my first attempt and I have since made another tidier, better fitting one.

Image



So on to the blade clamp...
So I bought this eye bolt from eBay
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2-Pack-M6-Th ... 1438.l2649
As it actually gave the inside diameter as 10mm, which is needed for the blades. So similarly to the depth stop above, I used a combination of the small files and the top tapered end of the 10mm square Bahco files to form a nicely fitting square hole for the blades.

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The knurled thumb nuts I bought are a pair of these on ebay
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Brass-Knurle ... 2749.l2649
One is used for securing the blade clamp, the other I used for the height adjuster.

Note that I did polish up the thumb nut (not the knurled edge) by mounting the nut on an M6 threaded rod and used the OTT micro-grit pads again.


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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 20:23 
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Try using your scrapers and parting tools next time to shape instead of files, just as if you are turning wood, better finish and easier diameter control.
No lubricant required for brass, machine dry as you would cast Iron.
Use paraffin for aluminium.

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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2018, 20:25 
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On to the fine height adjuster...

So in the spirit of trying to keep as much of the hardware as I could in Brass, I bought some M6 threaded rod for the height adjuster.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Brass-Studdi ... fGDcKwwHcA

As I said before, I picked M6 for the height adjuster as it’s thread has an exact 1mm pitch, so one full turn of the adjustment knob means a rise or lowering of exactly 1mm.

So for the height adjusting knob itself I used one of the knurled thumb nuts and mounted it on an M6 threaded rod in the drill chuck on the lathe and I filed/turned it down to the exact thickness required for the Veritas blade. I also filed off the knurling here too. (Also polished up as before)

Eventually I plan to replace this height adjustment knob with a single piece turned myself, but until then I’ve epoxied the above shaped/smoothed thumb nut with one of these knurled thumb nuts from ebay
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/M6-Knurled-B ... SwY~1Z61Pl

I properly scratched up both mating surfaces to try and ensure as good a bond as possible, and clamped/screwed them together with the epoxy on an M6 threaded bar (which I covered with PTFE tape to stop it gluing to the threaded rod!)

Image

As you can see, I tried to protect the polished up brass surface with masking tape, but unfortunately the knurled nut did get epoxy stuck to the closest half of it, which I can’t think of a way of cleaning up without damaging the knurling.

Image



So that’s pretty much it, apart from the extra brass washers I made for the blade clamp (same method as before, but it’s not threaded).

I’m happy with the result, and the plane works great. I’ve not finished it yet, but it’s useable (which now means things on the to-do list of the ‘boss’ takes priority!).

I will need to trim the height of the height adjustment threaded rod and then epoxy on another knurled nut to the top of the threaded rod to tighten/loosen it making it easier to swap from front blade use to read blade use. Also may trim the blade clamp eye bolt. I will want to try waxing the plane too, possibly using Alfie Shine, but wasn’t sure how best to treat Lignum Vitae due to its own waxes etc.


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So thank you for reading my dyslexic waffle and please excuse my lack of photography skills too. Any future tips and advice will also be appreciated :D


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PostPosted: 03 Jan 2018, 08:36 
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Looks a cracking plane, love the LV.

You should be able to pick out the Epoxy from the knurling with a sharp tool like a scribe.

The LV is naturally greasy is should polish up with out any wax I have used a dremel with a felt bob on small objects.

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PostPosted: 03 Jan 2018, 12:20 
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I like it. It looks really nice. It puts my own home made router plane to shame, but then again any tools I make for myself are simply tools with no pretensions of looking nice. Even ignoring looks though, yours is better than mine because mine lacks the screw adjustable depth control, and I cannot reverse the iron. I like the idea of reversing the iron so I may steal that idea.

When I made mine I intended to put knobs on it, similar to yours but smaller. I started using it without the knobs and have never got around to adding them. I found I always want to push from behind the plane rather than from above it. i'm not sure having the knobs would contribute anything. Can you comment on that? Do you think yours is better due to having the knobs, and if so, how?


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PostPosted: 03 Jan 2018, 13:24 
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Pete Maddex wrote:
You should be able to pick out the Epoxy from the knurling with a sharp tool like a scribe.

Thanks Pete, Will try picking out the epoxy when i get a chance, just didnt want to end up scratching the brass too much.

Pete Maddex wrote:
The LV is naturally greasy is should polish up with out any wax I have used a dremel with a felt bob on small objects.

Thats one of the reasons I've hesitated before applying any finish, as it looks pretty good as it is at the moment, so will hold off and buff it up more.


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PostPosted: 03 Jan 2018, 13:29 
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Just4Fun wrote:
When I made mine I intended to put knobs on it, similar to yours but smaller. I started using it without the knobs and have never got around to adding them. I found I always want to push from behind the plane rather than from above it. i'm not sure having the knobs would contribute anything. Can you comment on that? Do you think yours is better due to having the knobs, and if so, how?

Hi Just4Fun, having the handles directly in line with the blade in its traditional position and held at the an angle, so kinda pointing towards where the blade would be cutting (where the force is applied), seems to be a good transfer of forces and it works great! Having the larger handles helps too as its much more comfortable in my hands (i do have large hands though) and i can get a good comfortable grip. So i dont know if its 'better' having the handles compared to without, but they work very well for me.


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PostPosted: 03 Jan 2018, 14:30 
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Just4Fun wrote:
When I made mine I intended to put knobs on it, similar to yours but smaller. I started using it without the knobs and have never got around to adding them. I found I always want to push from behind the plane rather than from above it. i'm not sure having the knobs would contribute anything. Can you comment on that? Do you think yours is better due to having the knobs, and if so, how?


This is something that also interests me - I suspect that handles were originally just a convenient way of holding a metal router, and this pattern has been copied by modern wooden routers. I've only ever used Old Womans Tooth type routers, where the body itself is designed to be held and it's easy to apply both downward pressure and forward direction from behind the iron. I am intending to make one with a bent iron, so I'll add one more drop to the ocean of hand router WIP's.

This is certainly a very handsome router however - anything that I am capable of knocking together will be rather more utilitarian in appearance.

Cheers,
Carl


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PostPosted: 04 Jan 2018, 18:08 
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Lovely job, I like that a lot =D>

I have been considering buying a router plane but this has made me think again.

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PostPosted: 04 Jan 2018, 18:48 
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Farmer Giles wrote:
I have been considering buying a router plane but this has made me think again.

Not only is it the sense of satisfaction, but it also saved a chunk of money forking out for the Veritas one. The main cost was for the Veritas blades, so the cheapest I found them (and the sharpening jig) is from the below website...

https://www.canadiantools.co.uk/tools/V ... Plane.html



CHJ wrote:
With a little ingenuity Knurling on brass would be possible on wood lathe.
If you can devise a method of holding one of these clamp type Knurling tools on your tool rest system you should be able to achieve the cut by tightening the adjaustment nut.
https://www.chronos.ltd.uk/engineering- ... w-chronos/
You might want to use a smaller version for your tool nuts.

Thanks to your suggestion Chas I have now ordered a similar knurling tool to your suggestion, so will try to give it a punt.

The fine adjustment thumb nut was actually too small to be able to reach the blade in both positions, hence having two holes and needing to move the brass threaded rod, but if i’m able to make my own nut from scratch that reaches both sides from one position then it would be a big improvement.

If I end up doing that though, I may just fill the two existing holes with epoxy and maybe put a shaped brass plate over the top surface, which would hide the ugly filled holes :D


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