Moderators: Random Orbital Bob, nev, Noel, Charley, CHJ

 Reply
User avatar
By CHJ
#939910
A taller vase was mentioned as a requirement by someone who must be obeyed, if this was to be constructed with minimal sections this meant that a set of staves long enough needed cutting on the bandsaw.
The resultant cleanup of adjoining surfaces and reasonable glue up lead to a rather short lived burst of euphoria when the realisation that holding the said assembly for safe machining was not going to be straightforward with existing chuck jaws etc.
DSCN4776.JPG

Driving the piece for initial cleanup was achieved by using 4 long studs in the Cole jaws , (can't use 8 studs on a 12 section cylinder if it's to run as true as possible) but the matter of supporting and centralising at the tailstock end needed the construction of a spreader adaptor to use with the rotating tailstock.
DSCN4777.JPG
DSCN4778.JPG

This allows the centralising of the piece at the tailstock end and provides secure pressure against the driving chuck.
DSCN4780.JPG
DSCN4781.JPG

Rough truing of the blank and subsequent forming of a tenon to enable mounting of the blank on a standard chuck for improved concentricity control and secure holding for hollowing.
DSCN4782.JPG
User avatar
By CHJ
#939911
Because the overhang will be significant whilst hollowing a substantial base fixing ring was turned with a recess to take my largest gripper jaws and a socket turned to take the spigot on the cylinder.
DSCN4784.JPG
DSCN4785.JPG
DSCN4786.JPG

The cylinder was glued in with cascamite, checking it was running true on the lathe whilst still wet.
DSCN4787.JPG

When cured, a small section on the end was rough turned to the neck shape envisioned and end prepared to take a chuck collar that if all goes well will also provide the material for the finishing collar.
DSCN4788.JPG
DSCN4789.JPG

This can be seen being glued on and prepared with small chuck dovetail socket, also note the centre hole provided for support and subsequent alignment aid.
DSCN4791.JPG
User avatar
By CHJ
#939912
Using the tailstock for support the top neck portion was parted off.
DSCN4793.JPG

At this point note the various Crosses and Circles marked on the staves and chuck collar that may be seen in the images, these are to aid in the alignment of the staves in later re-assembly, with all the good will in the world it is most unlikely that all staves will end up exactly the same width. Remember to re-mark as material is removed.
DSCN4798.JPG

Then with light cuts the centre is bored out and the outer profile roughed, aiming to match the two profiles. As this is in effect an end grain piece as far as the hollowing is concerned I used a carbide cutter in plain boring mode , note the tape marker on the tool stem to avoid hitting the chuck jaws.
DSCN4794.JPG
DSCN4795.JPG
DSCN4796.JPG

The top edge prepared with alignment socket for contrasting collar.
DSCN4797.JPG
User avatar
By CHJ
#939914
And the collar piece prepared with tenon to match and the all important support and alignment centre hole and then glued on.
DSCN4799.JPG
DSCN4805.JPG

Reverse mounting the neck piece on the prepared collar/support, the centre is hollowed out to match the outer profile and the base edge prepared for subsequent re-mounting.
DSCN4800.JPG
DSCN4801.JPG
DSCN4803.JPG

As said before, all hollowing is basically endgrain with interrupted cuts due to differing woods into the bargain, as a consequence all you get is sawdust not shavings.
DSCN4804.JPG
User avatar
By CHJ
#939915
Back to the main assembly and the top collar is trued up and socket prepared for the neck and a large holding hole prepared for subsequent reverse mounting for work on the base.
DSCN4806.JPG
DSCN4808.JPG

Note:- I should have opened up collar mounting bore to match neck flare but was fixated on gripper jaw size rather than a custom jaw size, now have a delicate job of removing surplus when assembled.
DSCN4809.JPG

The main body was then carefully parted off from the work base.
DSCN4811.JPG

Reverse mounted on the collar hole, cleaned up and bore prepared for base fixing tenon.
DSCN4812.JPG

Base rough turned and combination tenon-socket formed to take main body.
DSCN4814.JPG
User avatar
By CHJ
#939916
Trial fit of components.
DSCN4815.JPG

And final glue up.
DSCN4816.JPG

Start of clean up.
DSCN4817.JPG

Open out neck and clean up inner neck joint areas.
DSCN4818.JPG

Sand and apply sealer to check for tooling marks.
DSCN4819.JPG

Do likewise with the main body.
DSCN4820.JPG
User avatar
By CHJ
#939917
Sort out some tailstock support to reduce accident risk whilst parting off.
DSCN4821.JPG

Part off as far as prudent and snap off.
DSCN4822.JPG

Fit wood jaws for reverse mounting to clean up base.
DSCN4823.JPG
DSCN4824.JPG

Clean up base as far as possible and coat with sealer to check for tooling marks.
DSCN4825.JPG
DSCN4826.JPG

Finally remove last centring pip with sanding disc mounted in chuck, and finish sealing.
DSCN4827.JPG
DSCN4828.JPG
User avatar
By CHJ
#939918
Then a few minutes attention with the buffing mops and a smidgen of Microcrystalline wax.


Voila! 230mm High.
DSCN4829.jpg
DSCN4830.jpg


DSCN4831.JPG


Hope that little lot is of interest.
User avatar
By Dalboy
#939971
Thank you for putting the time and effort into posting the process, it is much appreciated. I presume that it is English Walnut that you used with the ash.

What chuck did you use as I was looking at how the wooden jaws are fitted when reverse chucking
User avatar
By CHJ
#939973
Dalboy wrote:... I presume that it is English Walnut that you used with the ash

Not too sure on that score, it came from a furniture manufacturer as off-cuts and it varies from very pale to almost black dependant upon batch so may not be, the Ash came as sawn plank stock from Yandles.

The chuck with the wooden jaws is and Axy Precision, fitted with small Wood Jaw plates.