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By AndyT
#1337208
Sometimes some advice isn't the best advice. It was normal to use putty or plaster to fit a stone in a box.

I was clearly being too subtle when I said it got the shape it has because the last owner used it. Not by using it and then attacking it with an angle grinder to stop it being flat.
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By Bm101
#1337213
Can't offer advice but don't bin the plough irons whatever you do. Sell them. Even if you give them away. Just don't bin them.
By mrbadexample
#1337228
AndyT wrote:I was clearly being too subtle when I said it got the shape it has because the last owner used it.


No, I got that. And you said that I'm a beginner and the last owner probably wasn't.

That's exactly the point really, I'm a beginner so I'd be more comfortable with a flat one. :P

I'd be happy to try and hone a gouge on it, but a plane iron? A 1" chisel? I don't know how I'd do that. :?
By mrbadexample
#1337234
Bm101 wrote:Can't offer advice but don't bin the plough irons whatever you do. Sell them. Even if you give them away. Just don't bin them.


:shock: I throw nothing. One day I might need them. Or someone else might need them. Plus there are always other uses - strikes me as they'd be ideal for something like this. :)
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By ED65
#1337311
mrbadexample wrote:BLO and steel wool? :?:

I'd normally start cleaning with soapy water but I wouldn't risk warping a box like this so I think white spirit and old toothbrush to begin with, followed by more white spirit and regular changes of kitchen paper. When it's as clean as it'll get then BLO and steel wool by all means.

mrbadexample wrote:Hmmm...it was glued in once, rough side down, apparently. :lol:

Ah well, worth a shot! So flattening the top seems to be the way to go.

mrbadexample wrote:
ED65 wrote:How bad are the existing jaws?

Shot.

That does look bad but remember they were that way the last time it was used. Something else to bear in mind is that the pyramidal block on the end of brace bits is part of what the jaws grip to, internally where we can't see.

I've used braces with jaws that look similarly worn and they've held the bits from all right to perfectly well.

mrbadexample wrote:I'd be happy to try and hone a gouge on it, but a plane iron? A 1" chisel? I don't know how I'd do that. :?

My thinking exactly. I was going to link to a previous post of mine but it's in a verrrry long and contentious thread that you shouldn't get distracted by so I'll just quote it here.
I strongly strongly strongly advise you to start with flat honing surfaces, whatever they are, and keep them that way if they do require maintenance. You can use a dished stone later on when you know what you're doing but starting with one is a recipe for disaster. It's especially bad if you use multiple stones and only one is dished, and even worse if all are dished but with different curvatures! This is something that can see you chasing your tail for hours, plus can contribute to struggling with getting consistently good edges for years. And I do mean these times literally; I've spoken to numerous people online and in person who took up woodworking long before I did and still can't get edges they're happy with every time. And that's without the added complication of a curved honing surface!

Flat stones (any flat honing surface) are so much more versatile I can't emphasise it enough. You can hone to and fro or side to side, along the stong as well as across, anywhere on the surface, as mood, space or circumstances dictate and always get the same results. You cannot do this on a stone dished in one direction much less two.

Only on a flat surface can you do the bevel and the back, on any chisel down to the narrowest available up to the widest plane irons made, as well as hone a razor blade, a marking knife or an awl if need be, again in any direction anywhere on the surface with equal ease. Flat honing surfaces handle flat bevels, convex bevels or ground concave bevels; a dished stone can really only do one of those and not even as well.
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By AndyT
#1337325
Thanks for quoting that Ed. To the OP, I think the best thing you can do with that nice stone is to put it away until you are ready for it.
It is certainly not necessary for a sharpening stone to be flat but for a beginner it's easier.
Sharpening is a much discussed topic as a browse around this forum will show.
By mrbadexample
#1337361
AndyT wrote:Thanks for quoting that Ed. To the OP, I think the best thing you can do with that nice stone is to put it away until you are ready for it.


Sound advice, I feel.
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By AndyT
#1337363
mrbadexample wrote:Is this some kind of drill? :?:

DSCF3303.JPG


Yes, an Archimedean drill. One like yours would have been used by anyone doing fretwork, who needed to make fine holes to thread the blade through. I sometimes use one for pilot holes for screws.
By mrbadexample
#1337380
Thanks. :)

The box has cleaned up quite nicely. It's obviously made from two completely unrelated bits of wood - it might have been nice if it was all the top wood but it appeals to me because I'd have used whatever I could forage too.

DSCF3306.JPG
DSCF3304.JPG
DSCF3305.JPG
DSCF3307.JPG
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By AndyT
#1337385
You are about to learn why it's really not a good idea to remove a tenon saw handle unless it's really necessary. What you probably have is a thin sawplate that was drilled after insertion in the handle. As the drill burst through it bent the steel into a sort of rim around the hole. This fits tightly into the hole in the wood, possibly helped by a bit of rust. If you wobble it and pull it, you might be able to break the rim off and extract the saw plate, or force it through the sawcut in the handle. Or you could try drilling from the back of the handle using a bit very slightly larger than the present hole, so as to remove the bent over metal. Before you do so, ponder on how the rough rim actually helped make a firm grip, what size holes you need for your replacement screws and whether the cost of the new screws exceeds the value of the saw.
By D_W
#1337519
Ditto to what andy T says, there's a chance that you could clean the saw and get it back together. There's a GREAT chance that you'll break it getting it apart. I have made a few saws, and don't know about historical methods, but I have done as andy says - seat the plate, drill it. The plate stretches and the grip of the heated and then stretched steel is permanent. Mistaking it for sticking dirt will lead to a broken or torn up handle.
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By ED65
#1337693
The case cleaned up nicely! Shame about that little paint spot; you can get that later on when you know better how it might be accomplished but for now I'd leave it.

I think this might be a perfect little example of the extreme frugality of some previous makers. Why waste a second piece of hardwood when you'll only really see the lid?

Either that or he just didn't have any beech (?) spare at the needed thickness :D