Moderators: Random Orbital Bob, nev, Noel, Charley, CHJ

 Reply
User avatar
By Shane
#583293
It would also be worth getting hold of a copy of George Ellis' Modern practical Joinery, cheap enough on amazon and a very highly regarded book.

I put a bigger step with capillery groove in the cill compared to the one in morriks link, and also incorporate a slightly larger bottom snow bead (iirc, sorry if I've got the terms wrong)

The ones I've done recently have been in conservation areas, but not listed, so double glazing was specified so I used duplex glass and heavy duty springs rather than cord and weights. Obviously if it's listed you will have to do like for like.
User avatar
By AndyT
#583322
Challenging project! One way is to equip yourself with tablesaw, planer, thicknesser, spindle moulder and complete set of tooling. You would then be set up to work as a window maker for the rest of your days to make it worthwhile!
As you can imagine, there's not that much call for diy instructions after that sort of investment.

Or, at the other extreme, you could buy some handsaws, a few old wooden planes, a chisel and a gouge, and make them the way they would have been made a century ago. Slow, skilfull and satisfying.

Also, if you want internal glazing bars (dividing the glass into lots of smaller panes) it's a lot more complicated.
By twothumbs
#583582
Merchants /sawmills used to run redwood sash sections, sills, bottom rails, and other sections for joiners to make up new and for repairs. I would take a look around locally to see what may be around and off the shelf. It may still be available. Not so much call for it now. It would save a lot of running sections for you and you could save time to spend on making mitre profiles and that sort of thing. Or what about getting a machine shop to run the main stuff for you. You are going to have quite few metres. May not be so dear if they have the profiles. Just a thought and hope it helps.
By morrik27
#584095
twothumbs wrote:Merchants /sawmills used to run redwood sash sections, sills, bottom rails, and other sections for joiners to make up new and for repairs. I would take a look around locally to see what may be around and off the shelf. It may still be available. Not so much call for it now. It would save a lot of running sections for you and you could save time to spend on making mitre profiles and that sort of thing. Or what about getting a machine shop to run the main stuff for you. You are going to have quite few metres. May not be so dear if they have the profiles. Just a thought and hope it helps.


That reminds me, not sure where abouts you are.... My local Timber merchant in cambridge is a family run affair, any they do stock all the individual window pieces ready moulded for repairs, and new windows, the company covers pretty much the whole of east anglia, and (speaking only for the guys at one of the cambridge yards), are Very helpful and knowledgable

google "ridgeons cambridge" if you're in east anglia..
By colinbala
#584221
thank you all for your help, the project will be started soon, i have all the tools for the job and some new cutters on order from axminster for my spindle moulder, i should be ok with it, but never done any sliding shashes before, so i might be here asking for advice again SORRY!!!!!!! LOL.
cheers colin
By morrik27
#584222
colinbala wrote:
morrik27 wrote:I found these earlier this week, purely coincidently...

i found it helpful and interesting hope it helps you to. :)
thank you very much, had a look at the plans they will be very helpfull for me with my project,
cheers colin



PLEASURE! Don't forget to post some pics and update us, would love to see the finished product :)
By imageel
#588177
I recently built some windows in sapele for my workshop/shed, and having built replacement softwood windows before (just for my home) just by scouring the metalwork sites (espagnolettes, hinge manufacturers etc) for design hints, I did some digging on the net to find out if there was more usefull info about.
I came across a 2009 copy of the Trada guide for wooden windows, which gave some usefull hints as to issue such as stormproofing, pressure channels and drip design, as well a host of other good stuff.
Can share it with you if interested.
Will post some pics sometime of what I eventually made - they turned out ok for me :D