Moderators: Random Orbital Bob, nev, CHJ, Noel, Charley

 Reply
User avatar
By ColeyS1
#1330932
I'd be tempted to do something like this on the mk2 version.
Image
Allow your nosing oversized and route a groove into the top then glue your contrasting strip in. Buy adding the piece to the groove, providing the strip is snug ,(even if it's not you could make that over sized aswell) should ensure a good bond. You could wedge the strip forward if needed. The only thing I would do before is route/round the finished front edge before doing anything else.

Edit- what I meant when the strip could be oversized
Image


Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
User avatar
By Jacob
#1330933
RogerS wrote:.......

Design is all.
But not if the structure won't support it
Not Jacob's clunky old-fashioned rustic style.
Nothing rustic about trad staircases, least of all Georgian. Here's one, albeit newly made. https://www.homify.co.uk/projects/45876 ... ase-surrey
The 2nd step is very much what I did in my example above, the first step will be exactly the same design in principle. Note the thick treads - probably about 32mm.
Best of luck!
User avatar
By RogerS
#1330947
ColeyS1 wrote:Would a groove not make your life alot easier in terms of gluing up and getting a nice tight joint? The nosing would be wider aswell.

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk


It might, Coley but I think a wide nosing would look ugly. But as I mentioned, I ain't got any more oak. And I ain't got any more veneer. So it is what it is.
User avatar
By ColeyS1
#1330950
The nosing would be the exact same size to look at,just have more support underneath. It' have no straight through joint like you've got at the moment so wouldn't be relying on sticking end grain to end grain . The dotted line is where it would be cut back.

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
User avatar
By RogerS
#1330953
ColeyS1 wrote:The nosing would be the exact same size to look at,just have more support underneath. .....
Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk


Your nosing extends about 10x what mine does ! I have all the support I need. Just the wrong shape :(
User avatar
By Trevanion
#1330983
RogerS wrote:Design is all. Not Jacob's clunky old-fashioned rustic style.


To be fair, Jacob's "clunky old-fashioned rustic style" has been how I've been doing bullnose/d-end risers for years. Before that, it was removing all the material instead of kerfs, cut a dovetail on each shoulder so it acted like a sliding dovetail, make a softwood block that had the correct radius and the dovetails at the ends of the radius so that they locked together, it's very sturdy but very time-consuming. The kerfing comparatively is lightning fast and very simple to do and grants excellent results every time. I did a full d-end staircase the other day which requires a little more working out than a straightforward bullnose (with one of those you just allow plenty in the lengths each side of the 90-degree bend and cut to fit.), I spent perhaps an hour drawing it and the front end of the stairs with the newels up in full size on a sheet of plywood, a couple of hours making up the softwood blocks and machining the oak to size, half an hour cutting the kerfs and then another half an hour gluing it up.

As I said in your original design thread, I would’ve personally made the front up from segmented blocks but I understand that’s not the look you were going for. But that amount of short grain is a recipe for splitting in the heat no matter how much glue you use unfortunately. There’s some really nice chair “designs” that look lovely but structurally they’re terrible with way too much short grain everywhere.
User avatar
By Jacob
#1331000
Trevanion wrote:
RogerS wrote:Design is all. Not Jacob's clunky old-fashioned rustic style.


To be fair, Jacob's "clunky old-fashioned rustic style" has been how I've been doing bullnose/d-end risers for years. Before that, it was removing all the material instead of kerfs, cut a dovetail on each shoulder so it acted like a sliding dovetail, make a softwood block that had the correct radius and the dovetails at the ends of the radius so that they locked together,.....
Not to mention the folding wedges to to pull it all tight!
The reason why 'traditional' is worth looking at is that it is the distilled and combined wisdom of how to do difficult things, from generations of people struggling and succeeding in doing the stuff.
The word has at least two barely related meanings and can be nothing at all to do with Morris dancing, seasonal celebrations, folk singing with one finger in your ear, or "clunky old-fashioned rustic style".
User avatar
By RogerS
#1331001
Jacob wrote:.....
The reason why 'traditional' is worth looking at is that it is the distilled and combined wisdom of how to do difficult things, from generations of people struggling and succeeding in doing the stuff.
...


Yeah...right. Like people saying "Use Danish oil"

If you had your way, Jacob...we'd still be using logs to move stuff about and the wheel would never have been invented.
User avatar
By Jacob
#1331014
RogerS wrote:
Jacob wrote:.....
The reason why 'traditional' is worth looking at is that it is the distilled and combined wisdom of how to do difficult things, from generations of people struggling and succeeding in doing the stuff.
...


Yeah...right. Like people saying "Use Danish oil"

If you had your way, Jacob...we'd still be using logs to move stuff about and the wheel would never have been invented.
"Reinventing the wheel" in the case of your progressive futuristic stair case. Good job it wasn't a whole flight!
Last edited by Jacob on 18 Jan 2020, 17:47, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
By RogerS
#1331015
Jacob wrote:
RogerS wrote:
Jacob wrote:.....
The reason why 'traditional' is worth looking at is that it is the distilled and combined wisdom of how to do difficult things, from generations of people struggling and succeeding in doing the stuff.
...


Yeah...right. Like people saying "Use Danish oil"

If you had your way, Jacob...we'd still be using logs to move stuff about and the wheel would never have been invented.
Or reinvented in the case of your progressive futuristic stair case. Good job it wasn't a whole flight!


You've got the right word...progress !! :D
User avatar
By Jacob
#1331016
RogerS wrote:
Jacob wrote:
RogerS wrote:.....

Yeah...right. Like people saying "Use Danish oil"

If you had your way, Jacob...we'd still be using logs to move stuff about and the wheel would never have been invented.
Reinvented the wheel "in the case of your progressive futuristic stair case. Good job it wasn't a whole flight!


You've got the right word...progress !! :D
Oh is it finished? Well done.