Moderators: Random Orbital Bob, nev, CHJ, Noel, Charley

 Reply
User avatar
By Brandlin
#1336272
MikeG. wrote:
Brandlin wrote:
MikeG. wrote:It's pronounced "skon". Glad I was able to settle that for you.

Now, as to the recipe.........buttermilk is the magic ingredient. If it doesn't have buttermilk they'll be OK today but nearly inedible tomorrow. If it does have buttermilk, you'll eat them all today anyway.



How the hell are you leaving fresh scones until the following day???

Skon.


We usually make 15 or 18 at a time.......so whether there are any for the following day depends on the time of day they're made. :wink: :lol:


Nope. Scones exist ... scones get eaten. :-)
User avatar
By Trainee neophyte
#1336274
phil.p wrote:
treeturner123 wrote:Pronunciation of Scone
There is on the internet, a map of the UK showing where each pronunciation is in the majority. Search Scone Map of UK
Surprisingly, London is not on its own for once!!
Phil


Interesting. I'd have thought Cornwall would have been bluer. I don't know of anyone of my generation who pronouces it skon............ but it's not surprising really, half of Cornwall is no longer Cornish, it's full of people who've fled the cities.

Between Bodmin and Liskeard it is "scon", and bleddy 'ansom,too! Jam first, like normal people, and more cream than you can safely fit on. Butter for that cholesterol timebomb feel.

Making clotted cream - I have done it a few times, and it sometimes worked. If you can get your hands on raw milk direct from a farm, that would be best (and probably illegals, but shhh). You can add whipping cream to the milk, for more clotted cream if it works (probably recommended), and I did it by putting a large tray of milk in the oven at 80°C and left it in overnight. Sometimes you get clotted cream, and sometimes you get...warm milk.
By Andy Kev.
#1336277
Nigel and TN: It's interesting that you both refer to milk in the making of clotted cream. The bloke on YouTube makes it from double cream and also recommends 80°C. I did of course set my oven to that temp but given that little more than a rice pudding style skin formed on top, I wondered if the oven temp was accurate.
User avatar
By Phil Pascoe
#1336278
Trainee neophyte wrote:Between Bodmin and Liskeard it is "scon", and bleddy 'ansom,too!


There is a large difference in vernacular from East Cornwall to West Cornwall - East Cornwall tends to br far more English.
User avatar
By Droogs
#1336436
As an ex-resident I can definitively say that it is pronounced Scone and to para phrase "as long as there are 100 of us ... the jam goes on first."
By Andy Kev.
#1336447
I reckon the only person who would put the jam on second and who was in full command of their mental faculties would be a food photographer because the result of mini-dollop of jam on top does admittedly look nice.
By Nigel Burden
#1336460
Andy Kev. wrote:Nigel and TN: It's interesting that you both refer to milk in the making of clotted cream. The bloke on YouTube makes it from double cream and also recommends 80°C. I did of course set my oven to that temp but given that little more than a rice pudding style skin formed on top, I wondered if the oven temp was accurate.


I never saw mother make cream, but I would imagine that it was probably my Grandmother who made it. The family left St Keverne in 1925 and moved up to Dorset.

Nigel.
By Nigel Burden
#1336461
Andy Kev. wrote:I reckon the only person who would put the jam on second and who was in full command of their mental faculties would be a food photographer because the result of mini-dollop of jam on top does admittedly look nice.


Oh dear. Wait for the Devonians to kick off.

Nigel.
By Nigel Burden
#1336465
phil.p wrote:
Trainee neophyte wrote:Between Bodmin and Liskeard it is "scon", and bleddy 'ansom,too!


There is a large difference in vernacular from East Cornwall to West Cornwall - East Cornwall tends to br far more English.


My mother was from St Keverne. Thirty six years ago we rented a holiday cottage in Traboe near Goonhilly Earth Station. I was looking for the cottage where mother lived and asked the old chap next door if he could tell me where Touch me pipes was, to which he replied, "Whad oo ee wan a know that for." When I explained he enquired further, what was my mothers G Grandparents names etc. We went out for the day, when we came back in the evening he came out in a great state of excitement. He said he could remember my G Grandfather who was a gamekeeper on the Lanarth Estate. We returned on holiday for many years and kept in touch. The son would phone us but his accent was very strong, which was not a problem for me, but for my wife and the children it was difficult to understand him. He sounded very similar to Jethro, but with a stronger accent.

Nigel.
User avatar
By MikeG.
#1336467
Nigel Burden wrote:......Oh dear. Wait for the Devonians to kick off.........



You called? I'd just remind you that the island of (what you know as) Cornwall is in fact an overseas territory of Devon, clearly indicated by its more common name......West Devon. The biggest issue facing Devon isn't whether or not the cream or the jam goes on first, but the deplorable lack of dredging of the Tamar allowing West Devon residents freer access to the mainland than they have any right to expect.
User avatar
By Phil Pascoe
#1336487
I was told by an uncle who was in his nineties about thirty years ago that when he was a child people from Camborne habitually closed the blinds on trains passing through Redruth so they didn't have to look at it. (Camborne greengrocers didn't sell red apples) I suppose we could always do likewise when going over the Brunel Bridge, and open them again a couple of hours later when back to civilisation. :D
User avatar
By Phil Pascoe
#1336489
I, my mother and both grandfathers were born in Illogan, which may be one reason I found the "Illogan" accents on "Poldark" weird. :D
My accent (like most) changes according to whom I'm talking - people have told me it's broad, others have told me it's not even noticeable. Maybe not so much now, but thirty years and more ago I met people who lived twenty miles west of me that I couldn't understand - for some the furthest east they'd ever travelled was Truro, and the times they'd done that they could count on their fingers.
A friend a while ago made the point that it's sad that the Cornish dialect will die out before the Cornish language. :cry:
By Nigel Burden
#1336552
phil.p wrote:I, my mother and both grandfathers were born in Illogan, which may be one reason I found the "Illogan" accents on "Poldark" weird. :D
My accent (like most) changes according to whom I'm talking - people have told me it's broad, others have told me it's not even noticeable. Maybe not so much now, but thirty years and more ago I met people who lived twenty miles west of me that I couldn't understand - for some the furthest east they'd ever travelled was Truro, and the times they'd done that they could count on their fingers.
A friend a while ago made the point that it's sad that the Cornish dialect will die out before the Cornish language. :cry:


It's not just the Cornish dialect that's in danger of dying out. Up here in Dorset very few younger people would understand the Dorset dialect which was already in decline when I was growing up in the 1950s. It does have some following today via the William Barnes Society.

For those who have never heard of William Barnes, he was a poet who wrote in the Dorset dialect in the 19 century. He was an educated man and a contemporary of the novelist Thomas Hardy, and, it seems, preferred to write in the dialect that he heard around his North Dorset home of Bagber.

Nigel.
User avatar
By Trainee neophyte
#1336553
phil.p wrote:
Trainee neophyte wrote:Between Bodmin and Liskeard it is "scon", and bleddy 'ansom,too!


There is a large difference in vernacular from East Cornwall to West Cornwall - East Cornwall tends to br far more English.


Entirely possible.

I went to school with people who speak English as though they had learned it as a second language. For example, the verb "to be":

I be.
You'm is
They'm is or they'm be (singular)

We'm is
You'm is
They'm be

Interestingly, place names in East Cornwall are purer Cornish than in West Cornwall, because the east was over-run by English speakers fast enough for the names not to degenerate (allegedly), even though the language died out sooner. So I have heard, anyway. Who knows for sure?
By Nigel Burden
#1336563
My late father in law spoke like that, and he was from Cowgrove near Wimborne Minster. My fathers older brother spoke likewise.

How be doin then
Where be goin then

Going back to the early-mid 20th century I think there was similarity in speech through out the west country which would be very difficult for an outsider to differentiate between, but the locals would be able to differentiate small differences. Having said that, my mother was from St Keverne and there was a definite difference in her speech and my father who was from East Dorset.

There are still quite a few Cornish place names on the Lizard. Ladenvean on the outskirts of St Keverne, Tregowris, Ponsongath, Gwenter, Tregidden, Tregarne, Porthallow, Porthleven, Gwendreath, Poltesco, to name a few.

Nigel.