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By Cheshirechappie
#1336113
phil.p wrote:Thank you. And we don't even possess a cup, let alone a bone china one. :D


Hmm. Interesting. So 'scoans' are common to them as use mugs, and those who use doilies. It's possibly one of very few things they have in common!

Erm - butter or no butter?
By treeturner123
#1336115
Pronunciation of Scone

There is on the internet, a map of the UK showing where each pronunciation is in the majority. Search Scone Map of UK

Surprisingly, London is not on its own for once!!

Phil
By Andy Kev.
#1336116
Talking of scones (rhymes with stones obviously), I tried to make some clotted cream (pronounced cloated cremm) as per the instructions on Youtube from Steve's Kitchen. The experiment failed miserably i.e. it just didn't clot up.

Any thoughts? For instance what fat content should the cream have that you use? Or could it just be that the heat control on my oven is not particularly accurate?
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By Phil Pascoe
#1336120
treeturner123 wrote:Pronunciation of Scone
There is on the internet, a map of the UK showing where each pronunciation is in the majority. Search Scone Map of UK
Surprisingly, London is not on its own for once!!
Phil


Interesting. I'd have thought Cornwall would have been bluer. I don't know of anyone of my generation who pronouces it skon............ but it's not surprising really, half of Cornwall is no longer Cornish, it's full of people who've fled the cities.
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By Phil Pascoe
#1336121
Andy Kev - if you were to go into a shop in Cornwall (or even Devon) and ask for some cloated cremm, I dread to think what you'd get. :lol: They'd probably think it's a colour from Farrow & Ball.
By Andy Kev.
#1336122
I was just joining in the general merriment. It is of course pronounced quelfy glop. :mrgreen:
By SammyQ
#1336130
The Queen...just remind me how we pronounce the name of the stone inside her throne in the House of over-priveleged-hereditary-landgrabbers when Lizzie R. got coronated? :-"

Sam
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By Brandlin
#1336147
MikeG. wrote:It's pronounced "skon". Glad I was able to settle that for you.

Now, as to the recipe.........buttermilk is the magic ingredient. If it doesn't have buttermilk they'll be OK today but nearly inedible tomorrow. If it does have buttermilk, you'll eat them all today anyway.



How the hell are you leaving fresh scones until the following day???

Skon.
By AJB Temple
#1336160
I recently (2 weeks ago) did a cookery course with James Martin as the teacher. (It was fantastic). One of the things we cooked was scones. He is primarily a pastry chef (and a good one) by career and training. These were his main tips:

Tip 1 - Do not use cheap supermarket flour. Buy the best flour you can get your hands on. Preferably stone ground. It makes a massive difference.

Tip 2 - see Tip 1 and pay attention.

Tip 3 - work the mix with your fingers, not a machine and don't overwork it. Stop once you've got a decent crumb.
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By MikeG.
#1336168
Brandlin wrote:
MikeG. wrote:It's pronounced "skon". Glad I was able to settle that for you.

Now, as to the recipe.........buttermilk is the magic ingredient. If it doesn't have buttermilk they'll be OK today but nearly inedible tomorrow. If it does have buttermilk, you'll eat them all today anyway.



How the hell are you leaving fresh scones until the following day???

Skon.


We usually make 15 or 18 at a time.......so whether there are any for the following day depends on the time of day they're made. :wink: :lol:
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By Phil Pascoe
#1336172
I'm 66 and I remember eating them as a young child, but not since. I can't say I know anyone who bakes them.
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By whiskywill
#1336177
lurker wrote:I imagine the queen says skon


Surely she has somebody to say it for her.
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By Lons
#1336190
Andy Kev. wrote:Talking of scones (rhymes with stones obviously), I tried to make some clotted cream (pronounced cloated cremm) as per the instructions on Youtube from Steve's Kitchen. The experiment failed miserably i.e. it just didn't clot up.

Any thoughts? For instance what fat content should the cream have that you use? Or could it just be that the heat control on my oven is not particularly accurate?


Nah it's obvious really, do you ever check E numbers - there's one too many "E"s in scone. :wink:
I love scons, me!
By Nigel Burden
#1336259
Lons wrote:
Andy Kev. wrote:Talking of scones (rhymes with stones obviously), I tried to make some clotted cream (pronounced cloated cremm) as per the instructions on Youtube from Steve's Kitchen. The experiment failed miserably i.e. it just didn't clot up.

Any thoughts? For instance what fat content should the cream have that you use? Or could it just be that the heat control on my oven is not particularly accurate?


Nah it's obvious really, do you ever check E numbers - there's one too many "E"s in scone. :wink:
I love scons, me!


Could it be due to the fact that modern milk is homogenised and the fat doesn't separate?
I remember mother saying that they used to scald the milk in a large pan, leave it to cool overnight, then skim the cream in the morning.

I love scones with jam and cream, I also love saffron buns, but with the wife determined to not gain the weight that she's lost over the last four years, I'm afraid I don't indulge.

Nigel.