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By ByronBlack
#498932
RussianRouter wrote:Image


I see that guy has a problem of wondering where he should cut...judging by the marks on the edge and side of the door.

Why do some blokes do that when its the pencil line we're concerned about?

Sorry Byron,back tothe topic in hand.

:)[/quote]

More to the point, Id hate to see the decor of the house that door is going in - blue and green? Shocking ;)
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By frugal
#498938
ByronBlack wrote:More to the point, Id hate to see the decor of the house that door is going in - blue and green? Shocking ;)


My wife bought her house cheap because the previous occupiers had terrible taste: Turquoise and black bathroom; pillar box red bedroom with navy blue ceiling; orange an yellow dining room; mauve and pink bedroom... No one else was able to look past the colour scheme to see the original 1920s doors and original mouldings. We spent the first couple of months with large quantities of white emulsion paint ;)
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By ByronBlack
#498958
frugal wrote:
ByronBlack wrote:More to the point, Id hate to see the decor of the house that door is going in - blue and green? Shocking ;)


My wife bought her house cheap because the previous occupiers had terrible taste: Turquoise and black bathroom; pillar box red bedroom with navy blue ceiling; orange an yellow dining room; mauve and pink bedroom... No one else was able to look past the colour scheme to see the original 1920s doors and original mouldings. We spent the first couple of months with large quantities of white emulsion paint ;)


Ditto - our previous owners had a fetish for pink and purple squares, it was everywhere, 4 years in we are just finishing.
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By ByronBlack
#501278
Another really long day - I finished up at 11.45pm tonight after a much longer fit and glue-up than anticipated. My tenons were a little 'fat' and needed a fair bit of fettling to fit - that will teach me to be over-cautious when routing the tenons.

So the job today was to square up all the leg and rail pieces, cut the tenons and the mortices and glue-up. Here's the pics:

Using my new toy + rail to cut the tenons (worked really well)
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The top of the leg has a through mortice, the bottom is blind mortice. I need to trim this flush
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Leg assemblies glued-up and will stay in clamps overnight. Tomorrow morning I'll pierce the M&T's with some dowels - they were too tight a fit to drawbore.
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Tomorrow will see the aprons going on and the tops planed, but they will remain in stick until next weekend at the earliest. They are almost at equilibrium, but are just a couple of percentage points away for now.
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By Chems
#501279
Looking really good, your making quick progress.

Beware those sash clamps, mine just fell apart, very light pressure is all they are good for.
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By ByronBlack
#501280
Chems wrote:Looking really good, your making quick progress.

Beware those sash clamps, mine just fell apart, very light pressure is all they are good for.


Thats what I thought - but you should have seen the amount of pressure I put on those bad boys to close the joints, it was a very tight fit, my wrist/arm would give-up before those clamps, they have handled everything that I've thrown at them, I think I got a good batch though as a couple have broken off at the head, but my core set are rock solid.
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By woodbloke
#501295
Looking good so far BB. What's that Yellow Pine like to work with? Yandles have usually got a vast knot free selection of the stuff and I've been tempted on occasion to buy a lump - Rob
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By ByronBlack
#501332
woodbloke wrote:Looking good so far BB. What's that Yellow Pine like to work with? Yandles have usually got a vast knot free selection of the stuff and I've been tempted on occasion to buy a lump - Rob


The stuff I've got is really nice to work with so far. I bought it PAR and was expecting it to twist/warp more than it has while drying. The MC content was only about 4% above my shop.

There also wasn't much tension in the boards It was relatively easy to rip/crosscut to size with no surprises. The smaller pieces that would be my legs and rails were planed within a few days and left in stick - again, I was expecting them to move a bit before I assembled them, but they were perfect.

Working it is easy, it planes exceptionally well and has a nice glossy finish. There's not many knots in the timber, just a handful of smaller ones where they wont be seen. Routing is also very easy.

It's a lovely wood to use - a lot of the boards are straight grained and quite attractive, its more a light brown than yellow which is nice, I imagine that with age its going to look great.

Not sure if I would use it for furniture, I may make a tool-chest with it, but for fine furntiure for the home, it might be a bit 'busy'.
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By woodbloke
#501345
ByronBlack wrote:
Not sure if I would use it for furniture, I may make a tool-chest with it, but for fine furntiure for the home, it might be a bit 'busy'.


BB - thanks for that, it's reinforced my own view of what appears to be one of the better pines. I think it could be used for a piece of furniture, but the style would have to be chosen carefully...I reckon something chunkable like a low coffee table might suit it well - Rob
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By Chems
#501409
Bryon, I'm interested to know what swayed you to the English bench rather than the Roubo, was it material costs?
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By ByronBlack
#501413
Chems wrote:Bryon, I'm interested to know what swayed you to the English bench rather than the Roubo, was it material costs?


Partly yes - although, given I've since spent more cash on tools which I wasn't planning on, I could have theoretically afforded it.

The other reason was I wanted the front apron. I have a number of projects on the tuit list that will require the use of the apron - I realise I could have used a sliding deadman on the roubo, but I like the extra solidity afforded by the apron. (I have a solution planned that will still allow me to use clamps on the worktop from the front - which is often remarked as the main downside to an apron).

And lastly - after doing the face-to-face glue-up on my previous beech bench, i didn't fancy doing it again with timbers twice as long (my old bench was only 4ft long). I don't own a P/T so dimensioning and planing all that stock for the top would have driven me mad.

The most important choice of course was that the Roubo is french! I just couldn't bring myself to consider building a french bench ;)
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By Chems
#501430
Yes the lack of apron clamping would put me off the Nicolson. I want to build a beech roubo, but I'm just never going to get the time!
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By ByronBlack
#501435
Another update today:

Pics:

I'm glad I made some sawhorses before the workbench build, they are proving quite useful. Here i'm planing the edges square
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Smoothing the areas that will be glued to the legs
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The top rail didn't foul the trimming after-all
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Rear apron glued on to the leg assemblies
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Just for fun, I clamped the front apron to see what it would look like, its fudging big!!
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During the week, I'll be shaping the front apron, drilling the holdfast holes and planing the areas where it meets the legs. I'll also drill the mortice for the leg-vice guide board.
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By ByronBlack
#502076
Todays update:

My front apron was about 10-15mm higher than the rear apron which would cause a real problem with the top, so I had to trim and joint this edge. As I don't have a straight edge long enough to use my circular saw because it requires a very low piece to avoid fouling the motor, I decided to put my new router into service again - using a fairly straight decking board as a guide, I spent a fair amount of time routing off the excess material and prepared the edge for jointing:
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After the routing, I finished the edge joint with a No.7
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Trimming the excess leg tops with my trusty rusty ryoba (most versatile saw in my kit)
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I Wanted to get an idea of how it looks with the top
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Relieved the square edge with a bevel cut - sawed in situ with the ryoba again
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End of todays work:
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