Moderators: Random Orbital Bob, nev, CHJ, Noel, Charley

 Reply
By JimWoodwork1975
#1305667
Hi, I've sanded back our dining room table top and gone over it with Oak Sandolin Interior Woodstain (the manufacturer had obviously just sprayed it with something very cheap and nasty). Problem is if you give so much as a dirty look it fades - tea, ketchup etc fade the colour pretty much instantly. I thought this stuff was top drawer. Any ideas on why it's being anything but 'Tough and Durable'??

Photo attached.

I'm thinking of protecting it with a wax but I'm open to suggestions from anyone who may know better.

Cheers, Jim
Attachments
20190910_134025.jpg
By mbartlett99
#1305669
I don't think its meant to be used as a topcoat/finish more as well ... just a stain. It says on the can to use x or y as a finish coat over it. Tea/wine etc are pretty good at staining even through certain finishes on a good day.
By JimWoodwork1975
#1305684
Cheers, I guess I was drawn into the 'Tough and Durable' and didn't read the tin fully. Lesson learnt, I'll have read.

Edit: having now read the tin it gives no indication what to finish with. In fact it says '...does not require varnishing...'.

Perhaps they don't expect you to use it on a table top... anyway, I've emailed them to see what they say.

Cheers, Jim
By JimWoodwork1975
#1305842
Reply from Sandolin (Crown):

'We can only suggest trying Sadolin Polyurethane Extra Durable Varnish, please see attached technical data sheet.'

I have some screwfix no nonsense satin clear varnish (PU), I'll use this I think...
I'm wondering if I need to prep the stain at all before sanding? Any tips for going about this would be greatly received thanks. Jim
User avatar
By ED65
#1306438
JimWoodwork1975 wrote:Any ideas on why it's being anything but 'Tough and Durable'??

How much did you apply? Durability is partly a function of coat thickness, no matter what you use. You can take a superior finish like conversion varnish and apply it very very thinly for a barely-finished look, as is so popular these days, and bingo, you get the sup-par protection that many consumers complain about.

Also, how long has it been since you completed the table? Full protection is only provided after a full cure and a rough rule of thumb for oil-based finishes is this generally takes three weeks or more.

JimWoodwork1975 wrote:I'm thinking of protecting it with a wax but I'm open to suggestions from anyone who may know better.

Waxing offers little to no additional protection, despite wax being very waterproof innately. It's again because it's applied very thinly.

JimWoodwork1975 wrote:I'm wondering if I need to prep the stain at all before sanding?

Sanding (or scuffing by some other means) would generally be the prep, assuming the surface is clean. Can't hurt to wipe over with white spirit or a mix of water and meths if you want to ensure it's very clean; you can do this after sanding/scuffing as a means to remove sanding dust.