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By El Barto
#1200101
Damn that looks very clean indeed! That thick tenon looks really cool. I agree that wedged tenons sure do look good too...

I also noticed that you're using one of those automatic centre punches. I love mine, it must be my most used tool!
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By MattRoberts
#1200161
El Barto wrote:Damn that looks very clean indeed! That thick tenon looks really cool. I agree that wedged tenons sure do look good too...

I also noticed that you're using one of those automatic centre punches. I love mine, it must be my most used tool!
Yeah, it's definitely a handy tool
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By MattRoberts
#1200162
transatlantic wrote:Nice one Matt. It's looking nice and beefy. I see you share your workspace with the boiler too! (I also share mine with the washing machine)
Hah, yes - and a massive hot water cylinder. It's very cramped in the shop at the moment. Hopefully the new bench will help alleviate that, although I need to think of somewhere for the pillar drill to go...
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By MattRoberts
#1201483
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I find it tricky to get the fit just right. Too loose, and the through tenon has gaps. Too tight, and bam! Out blows a big chunk from the edge of the mortise!

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A bit of glue and some clamps fix the piece back - it's going to be pretty much hidden under the table top anyway.

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With the mortises in the leg components complete, I start working on the leg bases. I remove the majority of material using the bandsaw.

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I then use the router table to create a nice straight edge and curved profile for the feet.

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I used a speed square along with a bit of ply for additional support in order to cut the 45s. I had toyed with making the cuts on the tablesaw, but didn't think it was worth the hassle.

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Here's the completed leg assembly prior to chamfering and glue up, and a close up of one of the legs.

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By MattRoberts
#1201485
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Next I start working on the main base rails. These are going to be tusk tenons, so the tenons themselves are very long. I marked out all of the bits as usual.

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Cutting the cheeks on the tablesaw again, and then I used the bandsaw to cut the shoulders to size.

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Once the tenons were more or less there, I could use them as references to mark my layout of the mortises on the legs.

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The usual cutting knife lines and marking the centres ready for drilling.

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As these mortises are through the thickest part of the legs, and I'm drilling four of them, the mess was phenomenal! I have the kit ready to make dust extraction for my drill press, but haven't got round to putting it together yet. This mess has just bumped it up my priority list :D

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One of the tusk tenons in place. In hindsight, I would have like to have had more tenon poking through, especially as I'm using softwood. There's a chance that the tusk wedge could pop the end of the tenon off.

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A lot of chopping and a lot of mess later, and all four mortises are done. It's surprisingly stable even as just a dry fit, which makes me feel even more confident about its stability once assembled.
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By will1983
#1201492
That looks great Matt, certainly looks plenty strong enough!
Are you planning on putting a cabinet with drawers inside?
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By MattRoberts
#1201595
will1983 wrote:That looks great Matt, certainly looks plenty strong enough!
Are you planning on putting a cabinet with drawers inside?
Thanks Will! Yep, that's the thought. I could fit three decent sized drawers in there
User avatar
By Paul200
#1201627
MattRoberts wrote:Image

A lot of chopping and a lot of mess later, and all four mortises are done. It's surprisingly stable even as just a dry fit, which makes me feel even more confident about its stability once assembled.


That's exactly how I felt when mine got to that stage! It's looking very nice Matt.
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By will1983
#1201648
If you are anything like me Matt, things get dropped into drawers when I'm tidying up and if that drawer is too deep the item is never to be seen again.
I would always rather have more shallower drawers than a few deep ones, that way I can see at a glance what is in there when I open it.
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By MattRoberts
#1201664
will1983 wrote:If you are anything like me Matt, things get dropped into drawers when I'm tidying up and if that drawer is too deep the item is never to be seen again.
I would always rather have more shallower drawers than a few deep ones, that way I can see at a glance what is in there when I open it.
It's a good shout. I've recently just built a mitre station with a ton of drawers for storage, and at the moment everything I have in the shop has a place to be, so I'm not even sure what I'd store under the bench! I'll have a think when I come to build them.
By Hornbeam
#1201740
Hi Matt. How thick did you decide to make the top. I regularly use G clamps to hold work down ont te bench for jobs like routing etc. Most of my clamps are 6" so with a 4" thick top I can just about get 2" thick timber clamped. Having an apron or a very thick top might make this facility more difficult. Anything over 4" thick is probably overkill

Ian
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By MattRoberts
#1201763
Hornbeam wrote:Hi Matt. How thick did you decide to make the top. I regularly use G clamps to hold work down ont te bench for jobs like routing etc. Most of my clamps are 6" so with a 4" thick top I can just about get 2" thick timber clamped. Having an apron or a very thick top might make this facility more difficult. Anything over 4" thick is probably overkill

Ian
I'm using CLS, so after it's dimensioned it's about 80mm thick. I tend to use F clamps, and have a variety of capacities that will easily cater for decent sized work. However, I imagine I'll do the majority of holding with the vices to be honest :)
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By MattRoberts
#1201940
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With the rails clamped in place, I marked the tenons to determine how much is sticking out on each tenon.

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I then did all of the layout for the tusk mortises, giving a good 5mm additional depth to ensure there's enough room for the tusks to pull them tight, even if the soft wood compresses slightly. You can see there's only about 30mm to the end of the tenon - not an issue with hardwood, but as I say I've seen this amount of wood pop out in the past when a lot of pressure is applied.

Then it's back to drilling and chopping the mortises, which is becoming a real pain by now. Fortunately these are the last mortises to chop until I do the bench top, so at least I can have a break from it!

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I used a couple of bits of scrap ply to support the tenon whilst chopping, and it seemed to work ok.

I then cut four wedges from some sapele, and shaped them using the belt sander. It was very much a case of trial and error to get the angle and the fit right to ensure that when seated properly the tusks stick out an even amount above and below.

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Once one was complete, each remaining tusk needed to be individually fettled, as the mortises weren't all precisely the same.

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It's nice to get a little bit of contrasting colour / wood into the bench, as it's all been a bit bland up until now :D