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By Dibs-h
#1314450
Can you not use some of those fixings that are lower down in the last picture? Or is there no lath directly underneath where you would screw down? Just thinking out aloud.
By DomD
#1314456
Dibs-h wrote:Can you not use some of those fixings that are lower down in the last picture? Or is there no lath directly underneath where you would screw down? Just thinking out aloud.
Yeah I can't fix any further along (would be over the flashing) or lower (would not be over a batten). I think I will have to rip up some of the onduline sheets and have this overlap go over onto the next batten.
Dom
By DomD
#1316217
I layed a longer sheet over the flashing and fixed below, there is a small bump but it doesn't lift at the bottom anymore.
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By DomD
#1316928
Roof now basically finished - but I am one ridge piece short!
I made a 'ridge board' with a 2x2 and a batten
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Then added the ridge all along with foam fillers. This means no ventilation at the ridge but I will use comb fillers at the eaves to allow airflow.
ImageImage

Next it's the internal wall, painting then electrics. I'm going to run a 10mm² swa cable for 40A in the shed. That should be enough to run the heaters (4kW), lights and some tools.
User avatar
By MikeG.
#1316975
The electricity needs to be certified by a qualified electrician, who'll need to test everything including earthing. Leave the calculation of the cable size to him. He'll need to wire up the consumer unit, which isn't a DIY job. Many electricians will let you run the circuits for the sockets and lights, and simply check inside a couple of the fittings to see that you've done it properly. Otherwise, leave the electrical connections to a professional.
By DomD
#1316976
MikeG. wrote:The electricity needs to be certified by a qualified electrician, who'll need to test everything including earthing. Leave the calculation of the cable size to him. He'll need to wire up the consumer unit, which isn't a DIY job. Many electricians will let you run the circuits for the sockets and lights, and simply check inside a couple of the fittings to see that you've done it properly. Otherwise, leave the electrical connections to a professional.
Yeah should have specified but this was discussed and will be done with an electrician.
Dom
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By Krysstel
#1317015
10mm2 is what I'm running to my Norwegian Wood(shop)
It was sized for me by the electrician that will be doing the installation work.

Off that I'll have 4 circuits, 1 of them 3-phase (we have 3-phase 230V here).
And of the single phase circuits; 1 separate circuit for lighting, 1 separate for extraction and 1 for all the rest.

Mark
By DomD
#1317066
Krysstel wrote:10mm2 is what I'm running to my Norwegian Wood(shop)
It was sized for me by the electrician that will be doing the installation work.

Off that I'll have 4 circuits, 1 of them 3-phase (we have 3-phase 230V here).
And of the single phase circuits; 1 separate circuit for lighting, 1 separate for extraction and 1 for all the rest.

Mark


Lucky to have 3 phase available, I'm going to have a 32A circuit for plugs, 6A for inside lighting, then 2 9A circuits for heating (my electrician wants to split it). I imagine I will just run extraction from sockets and if I do get anything permanent installed just plug it in.

For the internal wall I think I may as well insulate it; if I am heating only the inner room will having OSB on both sides of the wall cause problems? I suppose any vapour would condense on the inner vapour barrier.

I also am wondering if I need to add OSB around the skylight as a vapour barrier? This is done in houses.

For lighting I think I will use LED panels unless anyone has other suggestions. One for the smaller room, in the vaulted ceiling opposite the skylight and one in the entrance area. I may also put a LED tube in the 'loft' area which I am boarding and using for storage.

Dom
By DomD
#1319232
Attic boarded with 18mm osb - maybe a bit over the top.
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I also boarded a shelf on the opposite side. I screwed 2x2s into the wall structure at each side to support the edge of the sheets.

Then I moved onto the interior wall, first laying out with a chalk line, then fixing the sole and top plates. I used multifix screws - not intended for anchoring but work fine here I think. I sealed the dpc hole with roof and gutter seal.
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I decided to add space for an internal window to let light from the large windows into the small room; this explains the framing for the left wall.
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The joist above the wall had been placed crown down so the top plate is actually slightly angled; only a few cms drop across its length though.

Next will be sheathing and insulating the internal wall.
Dom
By Gareth79
#1325576
I'm going through this thread because it's pretty close to what I figured out I want to build, lots of good information many thanks to all! I'll post my own thread soon I think with some ideas to get some comment on before I submit for planning permission (I'll need PP because it will be within 2m of a boundary and I want a decently pitched roof).

One question - DomD what software did you do the framing designs in?
By DomD
#1325624
Gareth79 wrote:One question - DomD what software did you do the framing designs in?

It's in fusion 360 which isn't really designed for it but works alright. In reality though I didn't stick to locating the framing as in the model when I built it and instead just marked based on spacing. Model was more for material estimate.
Dom
By Gareth79
#1325756
DomD wrote:
Gareth79 wrote:One question - DomD what software did you do the framing designs in?

It's in fusion 360 which isn't really designed for it but works alright. In reality though I didn't stick to locating the framing as in the model when I built it and instead just marked based on spacing. Model was more for material estimate.
Dom


Thanks, yes I think learning another piece of software is probably too much effort for me! I have used Revit to do the overall design, which will do me fine for the planning permission drawings, and I then I can manually work out the rest. I have gathered that studwork is generally not precisely planned out (the same as a bricklayer isn't told how to lay each brick), but as you say for a DIYer it's necessary to get a fairly close estimate to avoid ending up with too much or (worse) too little timber.
By DomD
#1327045
I have now rolled on three coats of emulsion on all surfaces; I was planning on doing the attic too but that seemed a waste of time so instead I added a wooden 'border' and painted up to that.

After the first coat it looked like this, this was a slightly watered down coat:
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Then the final two coats:
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Not perfect but good enough I think.

I'm putting the electrics in with my electrician before New Year; he has persuaded me to use plastic conduit to keep things neat. These will go directly into metal-clad socket knockouts. There are going to be four circuits: 6A interior lighting, 6A exterior lighting (security lights & maybe other), 32A sockets, 20A heating.
I'll post some photos when its done!
Dom
By AJB Temple
#1327061
Add at least one 16amp outlet. Sods law dictates that at some stage a bandsaw or PT that you buy will require it. Costs peanuts at installation time.