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By FH93
#1333095
As you'll be able to see from the images, my woodworking skills leave a lot to be desired. I have absolutely zero prior experience, and this is my first ever project.

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I used a circular saw to cut the pieces, and many of them didn't cut as level as I would have liked. I think my inexperience using a circular say really screwed me over here. It's held together by screws and wood glue. I don't have a sander or anything I can use to level out the pieces of wood, so I put it together as best I could.

As you can see, the top is not level, so I will need to get a sander of some sort to level it out, and the wood in the center is even worse. I was originally going to have two planks of wood connecting each two parts, one on the top, and one on the plank in the middle, but I might have to leave the latter considering how poorly it's set. If I get some tools to cut out a portion on the center blocks I might do it in the future, but at the moment I don't have anything for it.

I don't have a sander at the moment, so I will need to get one. I think I'll definitely need to get a mitre saw as well, considering how poorly I cut the blocks of wood. The only thing stopping me is that I don't have the money at the moment, so I'm going to have to wait a little while before I can put more funding into this.
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By MikeG.
#1333096
I'm not completely clear how you propose fixing a top to those legs, but what I am clear about is that you don't need a sander. That adjustment requires a saw and a plane. Don't fall into the trap of thinking there is a magic power tool to sort out every woodworking issue! :)
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By thetyreman
#1333100
sorry to sound harsh but it might be worth re-building these, all you need is a hand plane, bevel gauge a chisel and tenon saw, the compound bridal joint is not easy but it's a very good introduction to hand tool work, if you can do that you'll be able to do most joinery, paul sellers has a video series about making them here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6Y1VcK68e4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ultj5I1d7zw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t85AvNr7yyI
Last edited by thetyreman on 29 Jan 2020, 16:14, edited 2 times in total.
By FH93
#1333101
I was going to sand it down so it's level. If a saw and plane is better, then I'll go with that. I guess I don't know well enough to use the right tools yet :D

Here's a poor mspaint drawing of what I'm going to do

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I was going to lay a plank of wood across like this, and screw it down onto the a frames. I had planned on doing the same on the planks of wood in the middle of the a frames, but at the moment, they're not nearly level enough to try it.
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By thetyreman
#1333106
having a workbench helps to build them as well :D your plan should work just fine as long as they're the same height as each other and they're flat enough before attaching, however it'll never be as strong as the traditional type of sawhorses made with compound bridal joints.
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By El Barto
#1333121
You've done a pretty good job here considering it's your first time! Not bad at all, you should be pleased.

Using a circular saw is harder than it looks - it takes practice, especially when cutting mitres and compound angles. So don't be too hard on yourself.

These are certainly workable - get yourself a plane or a saw as mentioned and you'll be able to level the tops pretty quickly.
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By MikeG.
#1333135
FH93 wrote:.....Here's a poor mspaint drawing of what I'm going to do

Image

I was going to lay a plank of wood across like this, and screw it down onto the a frames. I had planned on doing the same on the planks of wood in the middle of the a frames, but at the moment, they're not nearly level enough to try it.


OK, that won't really work on its own. You are going to need some serious bracing, from low down on the legs up to the underside of the top, otherwise these will fall to bits the first time you try to use them. However, don't despair. That's easy. A couple of bits of 3x1 or similar screwed onto the legs and you're done. I can tell you now that you'll be using these saw horses to help you make your next pair, and when you do that you'll already have more experience, more tools, and the guidance of this forum. Your next pair will be grand.
By FH93
#1333139
Thanks for the kind words and advice everyone.

I think I'll try and see where I can get a cheap saw and plane, and a couple other tools like a chisel. A mitre saw is still definitely on the list though :lol:
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By custard
#1333149
FH93 wrote: I have absolutely zero prior experience, and this is my first ever project.


Good for you, you got some wood, picked up some tools, and you actually made something.

Is it brilliant? No, but persevere and you'll keep improving. Nail a couple of boards to the sides of your legs at the top, and you've made something that'll qualify as a saw horse. They may not be pretty, but they'll get the job done.

There's at least one big lesson here though (and progress in woodworking is all about searching out the lessons every time you make something), you'll find woodworking will be much more productive if you build to a definite plan rather than just knock stuff together on the fly. You'd be surprised how really experienced cabinet makers generally won't even pick up a tool without a measured drawing and a cutting list, and that applies even when they're tackling pretty basic projects.

There are interesting saw horse plans on the web, here's one example,

https://s26462.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploa ... wbench.pdf

You can keep keep expanding your woodworking knowledge for quite some time by making ever more complex versions of saw horses. Here are the ones I use in my workshop which have double splayed legs, laying these out and cutting gap free joinery with hand tools can be reasonably challenging for the beginning woodworker.

Saw-Horses-01.jpg


Saw-Horses-02.jpg


Anyhow, good for you for making a start with woodworking, it's a wonderful pastime. Hope you keep attempting new projects and please keep sharing the photos!
By Nigel Burden
#1333176
If the circular saw is a problem use a hand saw. Shannon Rodgers, The Renaissance Woodworker has a good video on his website showing how to use a saw. there is a lot of information on the net, some good , some not so good. Paul Sellers is very prolific. I personally like him because he keeps things fairly simple, although he is a bit of a Marmite character, not liked by some on here, whilst other like him.

I sold my circular saw because I never used it, preferring hand saws. My first attempts at dovetails were horrendous, but they are becoming acceptable now.

Above all, don't give up. You've made a start.

Nigel.