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By Deadeye
#1350019
I have gradually clawed my way up the self-taught woodworking curve. From numpty to muppet.
I now have a project that is dangerously close to turning out ok and being allowed into the house (other than as firewood)...and I'm gripped by the fear of stuffing it up at the closing stages.
Lacewood (plane) - beautifully figured. How to finish. It's sanded to 240g.

Sanding sealer? No sanding sealer? Osmo? Beeswax? Lacquer?

Help meeeeeeeee!!

(for this purpose "help" means either humourous ridicule or idiot-proof step-by-step instructions).
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By CHJ
#1350029
Would help if you gave an indication of the design, is it just a 'show on a shelf' item or something that has to stand daily usage or items placed on it.

Any form of wax finish, then seal with sanding sealer first, cellulose or acrylic for minimal colour cast, or shellac based which will give either a little more, or a lot of colour change dependant on flake shade.

Any form of Finishing Oil, needs to be applied to bare wood.
By Deadeye
#1350091
Thanks folks!

It's a pair (*) of occasional tables to go at the ends of the sofas. 4 legs (my first cabriole turnings), a small drawer and a top.
They will be used for coffee cups and wine glasses I expect, so sounds like Osmo may be the way to go.

Thanks again - the knowledge and helpfulness here is amazing.
By Deadeye
#1350093
(*) "pair" may be a flexible term in this instance. I have, for example, turned 9 legs and am choosing the best-matched sets of 4...
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By CHJ
#1350104
Deadeye wrote:
It's a pair (*) of occasional tables to go at the ends of the sofas. 4 legs (my first cabriole turnings), a small drawer and a top.
They will be used for coffee cups and wine glasses I expect, so sounds like Osmo may be the way to go.
.


As this is a new venture for you I would suggest a Hard Wax Oil as an easy to apply and reasonably robust finish.

Can always be refreshed in a few years if someone does something silly with something very hot or objectional without a coaster.

Apply an even coat, lightly wipe off surplus 'puddles' after a few minutes when first coat of oil has soaked into wood, await until cured for recommended re-coat time and apply extra coats if required to give the depth of finish you are happy with.

Always lightly wipe off surplus puddles of polymerising oils a few minutes after application, if you don't you risk ending up with wrinkled or crazed patches where coating was too thick.