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By rxh
#941055
This is an experiment to make a scraper plane using a Stanley No. 4 as the basis. The blade is held against a metal support which is bolted to the frog mounting holes in the casting. I made the parts and temporarily fitted them to my No. 4 to satisfy myself that the idea would work. Then I bought a No. 4 body from a well known auction site, transferred the parts to it together with new handles that I had made. The blade is made of 1/8" thick O1 steel, bevelled at 45 degrees and inclined forward at 20 degrees from vertical. The usual style of front knob would be no good because the forward leaning blade would get in the way of a proper grip. I had to open up the mouth a little to allow good clearance for shavings. The central screw is first tightened to hold the blade and then the two small screws are tightened to provide additional security against the blade rotating in use. The completed plane works well.
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Here with my original No. 4 reassembled.
Last edited by rxh on 26 Jan 2015, 23:53, edited 1 time in total.
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By n0legs
#941066
I like it :D
What I particularly like is the use of an old tool and a few hours of your time to create a new tool =D>
Lovely handles by the way.
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By condeesteso
#941105
A brilliant idea, there are plenty of old No4s around and you don't even need a complete one! Very smart.
I'll own up - I've had a go with this plane, comparing it with Richard's small scraper plane and his Lie Nielsen. Both the small one and the LN are excellent - I think the No4 is very close indeed but I suspect a bit of time on the sole may pay dividends as it wasn't quite flat - not at all unusual in old No4s. That's just a guess but might be worth a go.
Very fine execution as usual Richard... whatever next?
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By AndyT
#941112
That's brilliant!

And although this one is, naturally, beautifully made to your usual stunning standards, the design looks simple enough for less skilful metalworkers to have a go at.

If I was the editor of a woodworking magazine I would be paying you for an article describing this in step by step detail. Unless you were thinking of making and selling batches of the finished article... IIRC Veritas had a go at something like this but gave up on it. Well done!
By Bedrock
#941360
Really clever "upcycling"!
What does the central long bolt do? Is it just to hold the blade in place or is there something I am missing? The blade looks too thick to achieve any bowing as with the no.60 scraper plane.

Mike
By rxh
#941386
Thanks for the kind comments, gents.

Bedrock wrote:Really clever "upcycling"!
What does the central long bolt do? Is it just to hold the blade in place or is there something I am missing? The blade looks too thick to achieve any bowing as with the no.60 scraper plane.

Mike,
Yes, the central bolt just holds the blade in place - it passes through the blade into the specially shaped nut. The blade is non-flexible, like in the LN scraper planes.

AndyT wrote:And although this one is, naturally, beautifully made to your usual stunning standards, the design looks simple enough for less skilful metalworkers to have a go at.

Andy,
If anyone wants to have a go I can provide details of how I made the parts and fitted them to the plane body. To simplify construction the knurled knobs could be replaced by standard bolts and bought knobs.
By heimlaga
#941460
That is really an impressive bit of machinistry but I just don't like the idea.
There is already a shortage of good quality number 4 sized smoothers that haven't been vandalized or broken in half and if this conversion trend continues for a few more decades those of us who cannot afford a new one from Clifton or Veritas will be forced to go back to wooden smoothers.
For some weird reson most people who want to make a scrub plane or a scraper or whatever tend to start from an old number 4 which means that only the new crappy ones are left for their intended use.

Would you please promote your idea as a way to upcykle a brand new Anant/Record or a Stanley Handyman. Then this would be an excellent idea!
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By bugbear
#941462
AndyT wrote:IIRC Veritas had a go at something like this but gave up on it.


http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.a ... 10&p=32635

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/tools ... om-tooling

BugBear
By Bigdanny
#941467
Hats off to you. Thats a cracking job. I always thought there must be a way to do this simply and elegantly I just never applied my mind to it.
What thickness steel/ brass did you use for the main holder. I'm guessing 8 or possibly 10 mm or equivalent.

Yours is soo much more than others that are floating around in the ether.
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By Paddy Roxburgh
#941470
heimlaga wrote:That is really an impressive bit of machinistry but I just don't like the idea.
There is already a shortage of good quality number 4 sized smoothers that haven't been vandalized or broken in half and if this conversion trend continues for a few more decades those of us who cannot afford a new one from Clifton or Veritas will be forced to go back to wooden smoothers.
For some weird reson most people who want to make a scrub plane or a scraper or whatever tend to start from an old number 4 which means that only the new crappy ones are left for their intended use.

Would you please promote your idea as a way to upcykle a brand new Anant/Record or a Stanley Handyman. Then this would be an excellent idea!



Oh come on, there are billions of no 4s out there and hardly anyone with the skills to make this. I really can't see this becoming the next big craze.

On another note. I have never used a "scraper plane" but do use a no 80 and card scrapers. Is there any advantage in these over a no 80? (apart from it looking great) I have read that the plane body makes it less tiring but can't say I find this an issue with the 80 (I do find it an issue with cards).
Paddy
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By Pete Maddex
#941485
The longer sole reduces the tendency to hollow the work piece and they are easer to use.
I have burnt my thumbs with card scrapers!

Pete
By heimlaga
#941486
Paddy Roxburgh wrote:
heimlaga wrote:That is really an impressive bit of machinistry but I just don't like the idea.
There is already a shortage of good quality number 4 sized smoothers that haven't been vandalized or broken in half and if this conversion trend continues for a few more decades those of us who cannot afford a new one from Clifton or Veritas will be forced to go back to wooden smoothers.
For some weird reson most people who want to make a scrub plane or a scraper or whatever tend to start from an old number 4 which means that only the new crappy ones are left for their intended use.

Would you please promote your idea as a way to upcykle a brand new Anant/Record or a Stanley Handyman. Then this would be an excellent idea!



Oh come on, there are billions of no 4s out there and hardly anyone with the skills to make this. I really can't see this becoming the next big craze.

Paddy


I don't know what it is like where you live but around here every aspiring household handyman seems to want a smoother. He usually abuses it until it breaks. It is pretty rare to find a high quality number 4 body without the mandatory cracks and missing chunks. Many have been broken in half and crudely welded or rivited together once or twice. I have also seen a number of longer metal planes that have been cut of in one end or both ends to turn them into smoothers.
For some reason those people tend to leave other types of planes behind rusting in the back of a tractor shed or old barn. Those planes have a much higher survival rate.
Just about any modification may become a craze......... and you do not need much skill to get inspired and weld up a very botched version of this excellent piece of craftsmanship.