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By Chris152
#1180838
Yes, I guess each of them could have supports that would be visible just below the edge of the table in the photos, but since
custard wrote:a lot's down to the quality of the joinery

I'll leave the first two alone for the moment!

If I were to aim for a build similar to the third table, given my lack of experience, would it be a good idea to start with a much smaller version to test things out and finalise my own version of the design? I thought to use un-steamed beech as I have a nice 3 metre piece here that would make a decent top for a coffee table (the house is starting to fill with them) and can easily get some more suitable for the legs etc. I'm assuming it's mortice and tenon for all those joints.
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By custard
#1180847
Chris152 wrote:If I were to aim for a build similar to the third table, given my lack of experience, would it be a good idea to start with a much smaller version to test things out and finalise my own version of the design? .


That would be really smart. Something like a matching occasional table would be a very nice addition plus it would give you confidence in the main challenges involved.

Rectilinear dining tables, such as the ones you've linked to, aren't particularly complicated, but the scale of the thing will introduce it's own problems. For example, a hardwood top that's say 6' 6" x 3' x 1 1/4", well that's about as much as you can manage single handed, and even then it's an awkward brute. The hardest job technically will be jointing up the top. For these contemporary designs you really want a really flat, clean appearance. So your glue lines need to be impeccable and your timber needs to be very dry and the sort of straight grained stuff that will likely stay flat.

Yes, it's M&T joinery for the frame, but you want every joint to be really good. So if one's a bit loose think about tightening it up with a bit of scrap veneer glued to the tenon cheeks, and don't hesitate to use a gap filling, slow setting UF glue like Cascamite. Draw out the joints full size on paper so you've got the dimensions fully resolved before picking up your tools, and make sure you have a dry glue up to check for square or irritating gaps before committing to the real thing.

Good luck!
By Chris152
#1180853
That's great - thanks Custard. I can see the greater challenges of scale and will have to reorganise my work space to fit the full-size version and me in, let alone managing to work on the top itself. Maybe if I build the legs etc first I can cover and use that to glue and finish the top on (my bench won't work, against the wall and too narrow). I'm hooked on the idea now and think I have to try, maybe I'll do a WIP starting with the smaller version so everyone can tell me where I'm going wrong! Thanks again for your thoughts.