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By mynamehere
#1267769
Good luck with your saw, other than me having to return the first one it is a nice piece of kit.
I got the kickback stop from Festool (it's only cheap) which clamps onto the rail after a bit of filing and the adapter for use with a router, this has come in handy a couple of times.

Have fun!

Ferenc
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By Lons
#1267886
I'll have a look at those Ferenc.
It had crossed my mind to make a router adapter myself. I looked at the GRS square guide while waiting for the Axi guys to agree a deal and it looked exceptionally well made but hugely expensive, am going to have a go at making something when I get time.
By Quickben
#1270849
I have the SP6000J, also. Good saw in general.

A few points:

The tracks are good by themselves, but joined together it is easy to introduce a small deflection. Use a known straight edge as a reference when joining.

I've also had the wobbly sole plate thing. There are allen head grub screws on the bottom for adjusting this, though. Not a problem now.

Take the outer shell of the blade housing off from time to time to clean it. If your cutting plywood regularly, the fine dust builds up around the internal strengthening ribs due to the glue between the plys. Also, the first time you do this, you'll notice there's no seal around the extraction outlet. A bit of electrical tape sorts this out.

The supplied blade is very good. When it came to replacing it, I went for an Axcalibre thin kerf 52T blade. To be honest, the cut is no better but there is less wastage and, therefore, less dust to extract.

The first thing I cut with it after buying, was some mahogany which it sailed through. The cut was very smooth, almost like it had been planed, with very little burnishing.

Overall, very happy with it. Especially given it's price in comparison with the black and green variety, and also the Bosch one.

Gary.

Edit: Before I bought it, I was talking to the bloke at Axminster, who said get the Makita one (I was leaning that way anyway). I asked why, and he said that people keep bringing the Festool ones back for one reason or another, and that there was nothing between the Makita one and the Bosch one except price. The Makita being £100 cheaper for the saw and £10 cheaper for individual track lengths.

They also do a router attachment, although at £30 it's a bit pricey for a bit of plastic and two steel rods.
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By Lons
#1270890
Thanks Gary
I haven't cut much with it yet but happy enough and will watch for the dust build up, appreciate the tip.
One question about changing to a thinner blade though, does that not affect the rubber splinter strip that would have been trimmed to the thicker blade?

I've been looking at whether I'd use a router attachment but I have 3 different routers, it doesn't look to difficult to make one up with some SRBP sheet.

You must have bought from the same salesman as me at Axi North Shields as he said several Festool saws had been returned. :) Can't remember his name but I've bought a few things from him.

Bob
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By will1983
#1270922
I've been using mine for a couple of months now and I love it. I can honestly say I'm now a track saw convert!

I found the supplied blade very good but a couple of laminate flooring jobs (notoriously hard on blades) have taken the edge off it now. I gave mine a clean with oven cleaner after the first job which does give it a new (albeit shorter) lease of life.

I have also bought a Freud twin pack (cross and rip cut) pack and I cant recommend this enough, £37 for two blades which eat solid doors for breakfast!

I have butchered a section of Titan wet/dry vacuum pipe to make it a tight push fit into the extraction nozzle on the saw, which gives me pretty good dust collection. This can be a bit clumsy however but that is due to the flexibility of the hose and not the saw.

All in all, I would (and have) recommended the Makita track saw to friends and will certainly buy another when this one wears out.
By Quickben
#1270968
Yes, Bob, it was the North Shields store (now moved to Tyne Tunnel Trading Estate) and recently, since I've been trying to bring a knackered old Axi bandsaw back to life, my second home. Also just bought one of their trade drill presses.

Yes, the thin kerf blade affects the splinter strip. There's a 0.6mm gap. Another reason I'm going back to the 2.2mm blade.

The only reason I replaced the original Makita blade so quickly was because I nadgered it cutting laminated kitchen bench. Huge difference before and after.
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By Eric The Viking
#1270975
will1983 wrote:I found the supplied blade very good but a couple of laminate flooring jobs (notoriously hard on blades) have taken the edge off it now. I gave mine a clean with oven cleaner after the first job which does give it a new (albeit shorter) lease of life.


They are re-sharpenable. I took several to our local saw doctors last summer, and they came back really nicely sharp. They tell me there is plenty of carbide so they can be re-done a few times yet. IIRC it cost around ten quid per blade, which makes it very cost-effective.

I like thin kerf (and Freud) blades generally, but now stick with the "standard-issue" ones for the tracksaw as I think they vibrate less and give a cleaner cut.

E.

PS: I used an offcut of water waste pipe as an adaptor (to the Numatic/Henry hoses) for ages, but the German Parkside (Lidl) vacuum hose fits directly without need for an adaptor, so now I use that in preference.
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By Lons
#1270999
Quickben wrote:Yes, Bob, it was the North Shields store (now moved to Tyne Tunnel Trading Estate) and recently, since I've been trying to bring a knackered old Axi bandsaw back to life, my second home. Also just bought one of their trade drill presses.


You're a bit closer than me ( 50 mile round trip ) so I can't just sneak in as the missus would get suspicious. :lol:

I use a couple of Freud blades in my table saw and they are pretty good.
By johnnyb
#1284742
ive had mine for many years and 4 years profesionally. its a grand saw. durable and accurate and remarkably powerful. for general joinery a tip i got on here was use a coarse blade. i got a festool one. its counterintuitive but is a really good recomendation. also the makita blades ive found really quite poor. the festool blades are what i think makes the difference, they are beautifully made and hold a remarkable edge. coarse blades are also less snatchy during plunging.
clamps are handy 3m rails too. as a jobbing joiner get everything in cases . replace the strip every so often.
always use a dust extractor. the plunge depth is a bit daft it should account for the rail depth. it can kick back cutting solid worktops or unsupported panels....but so can festools. the key is not to undertake dodgy cuts or maybe to recognise what constitutes a dodgy cut.
i love my 3m rail. i reckon its nearly essential on modern kitchens with all those tall end panels.