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By pollys13
#1110342
Again brilliant stuff Coley
" Rubs out much easier as well if you do put a line in the wrong place "......Ah........... right :)
I have the Charles Haywood book.
Just had a Google for Ashley Aisles butt chisels, which width should I go for?
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By ColeyS1
#1110389
pollys13 wrote:Again brilliant stuff Coley
" Rubs out much easier as well if you do put a line in the wrong place "......Ah........... right :)
I have the Charles Haywood book.
Just had a Google for Ashley Aisles butt chisels, which width should I go for?

Well I prefer the 2inch just because I have one. This mould is tiny compared with some frame moulds that need to be mitred. A 1.5 inch would probably be more useful to be honest, perhaps even a little easier to get use to.
I took a pic with a smaller chisel
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You might find a smaller chisel works fine. It's something I really struggled with in the early days. For some reason I also felt the need to lift the chisel off the mitre template and found smaller chisels a bit wobbly. Perhaps it's just me, mummy did tell me I was special :lol:

mikefab wrote:This thread is set to be THE Internet resource on window making!

Glad you find it helpful ;)

Coley
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By ColeyS1
#1110392
Before gluing, check your sash measurements.
Cut wedges
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Glue all your mortices and tenons and assemble the sash. Forgot to mention to label where the glazing bars go each time you fit one.
Have a couple parallel bearers /pieces of wood and lie your sash down on the bench
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On the top and bottom rails put a clamp each side of the rails. The glazing bars are small, so usually one clamp on any side is enough.
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Turn the sash over and check the diagonals. If the measurements are slightly different, hitting the longer measurements horn, might fix it
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If the measurements are still different, adjusting the clamps to pull the frame square will definitely fix the issue
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I've demonstrated this to the extreme. In reality moving the clamps 6mm will probably be enough to pull it square.
Once your measurements are the same, start wedging.
Start with your outside wedge to force the tenon up tight to the mortice.
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Tap this home and then tap the other one in. On the glazing bars, tap them in equally
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Be cautious with wedging and watch/listen to what's happening. I was told to smash them in till they stop but I think a better suggestion is to tap them in until you feel it's not going in anymore.
In the early days I was gluing a softwood sash and smashed the wedge right through the mould side ! You'll only do it once, but just be aware it can be done ;)
Clean off all the glue- your handsaw will thankyou later if you also clean around the wedges/tenons.
Stack them somewhere flat.

Coley
By johnfarris
#1110622
Nice thread Coley :) I have a couple of questions

Do you slightly angle your mortices to take the wedges?

What ratio do you use for your wedges?

I have always found wedges a pain especially when they break when you are at the start of tapping them in
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By ColeyS1
#1110632
johnfarris wrote:Nice thread Coley :) I have a couple of questions

Do you slightly angle your mortices to take the wedges?

What ratio do you use for your wedges?

I have always found wedges a pain especially when they break when you are at the start of tapping them in

I just do the mortices square for the wedges John. I know what you mean with the wedges snapping. I suspect alot of its down to short grain timber perhaps. My fave is when the wedge snaps but the hammer keeps going and strikes the edge of the stile. It's usually followed by my finger getting covered with saliva then smeared onto the half crown/dent, then a few choice words ! lol
I'm sure it happens to everyone, still gutting though. I usually make the wedges 70mm long and tapered about 14mm to 1mm. Most times they could be shorter but I prefer to keep my distance from the edge of the stile where possible.


DTR wrote:I must admit, sash windows leave me rather baffled. Nonetheless, this is fascinating stuff. Bravo, Coley =D>

There's not much to it really, it's just of little tasks that after a while start resembling a window. Thanks DTR ;)
pollys13 wrote:Thanks again for taking the trouble to show us all this.

No problem Peter. If you want to see a potential tablesaw jig for doing the 9 degree cill cut, just give me a shout and I'll cobble something together and post some pics ;)

Coley
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By ColeyS1
#1110634
Once the wedges are tapped in the sash clamps can be removed.
I prefer to let the glue dry before any further work, just to prevent smearing glue residue everywhere or bumping it out of square. The wedges perform the same job as sash clamps,so if you really really wanted to carry on, you could, just take it easy.
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Cut off your wedges.
Fill any small blemishes with brummers external filler (or an alternative) Any bigger holes/knots a 2pac filler is a better choice
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Belt sand each side. The rails first, then finally the stiles to remove the belt sander marks. You shouldn't need to go near the glazing bars with a belt sander.
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Orbital sand both sides
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Sand off inside sharp edges.
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Cut the top horns off. A tablesaw will make light work of it, or a handsaw would do exactly the same.
Cut your horns off the bottom. This will need to be a 9 degree cut to match the cill.
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If your tablesaw tilts to the right, your rebates for glass, 95% of the time, will always need to be facing up when performing this task- Yup you guessed it, early days I cut several the wrong way 8-) If you're doing this by hand, a fairly simple way would be to just saw the horns off square, then plane a 9 degree bevel after.
If your sashs/casements are a smidgen wide, offering just an edge in the hole will be a good indication you've got the height right.
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Once the fixed sashs are fitted into each opening, label them so they don't get muddled up.
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Chiseling the position will ensure it doesn't get painted over and lost.

Just the opening sash left !

Coley
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By ColeyS1
#1111174
If needed, get your hinge side stile to fit against the frame. I aim for a 2mm gap all the way the casement, so if it's tight for width, remove 2mm before you start
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Next, with the stile pushed tight to the hinge side, also allow a 2mm gap on the top and bottom. If somethings slightly out of square you may need to remove a few shavings to get the joints parallel. Don't be too hasty doing this. It's easy to remove too much VERY quickly !!
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Next step is to think about where you're going to put the hinges.
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Fairly near the top and bottom is best. On longer sashes you can use 3, but I think 2 should be adequate for this.
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I chose to keep them 30mm in from the rebate line.
Set a marking gauge to depth, allowing for a 2mm ish gap. This might mean going slightly deeper or shallower then the leaf thickness.
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If you wind back to machining the frame, you'll remember using a hinge to get the position of the rebates drip groove. This will be the height of your hinge, so set marking gauge to this.
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Next step- hedgehog time !
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With the your hinges chopped in the sash/casement, offer it into the frame. Ensure you've got your correct gap top and bottom (note 2mm packer in top gap), then transfer hinge lines to the frame.
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Square the lines into the rebate and chop in the hinge recess to the frame
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I find it easiest to chop the frame vertical. Before having a tail vice I always chopped the frame hinges with the frame flat on the bench. Whatever works for you [WINKING FACE]
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A small mallet and butt chisel is definitely a blessing when mallet swinging is restricted.
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Take off the closing leading edge. I prefer to do enough so the closing side shutss, but is still tight enough to plane the 2mm gap once the sash is hung.
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Im sure this'll be obvious, but to ensure you don't remove anything from the front edge (only leading edge) keep your plane away from it.
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Pilot drill one hole in each leaf. Use a normal pozi instead of the slotted brass, to make life easier.
Check the hinge side gap is correct.
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Remove shavings on the closing side so you've got a 2mm gap when it closes.
You should also have a 2mmish gap between the inside of the sash and frame rebate
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When you're happy with the gaps remove sash, and machine a drip groove around the entire outside of the sash.
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This should be in line with your hinge recess.
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There was a tiny slither left (poor machine setup) so I chiseled it off.
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Sand up edges.
That's all there is to it !!
Temporary pozi screws for making hanging/removal easier.
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A few shavings from-
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Will help it to sweep past the draughtstrip easier.
That's it folks.
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Hope this may inspire someone to have a go at making a window. Having a massive amount of tools can help speed things up, but the reality is, everything could be done with fairly basic tools if time isn't an issue. I'd say one of the most important things is to check your dimensions before getting out the glue pot.
I've got a few more pics of painting,fitting, but feel this is probably a good place to stop.

Cheers


Coley
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By pollys13
#1111273
" ...... A small mallet and butt chisel is definitely a blessing when mallet swinging is restricted "....... ahh :)

Amazing work and also a very nice window, looks to me like Oak but you said something else but the light changes how it looks.
As a time served experienced joiner how long did it take in toal do you think from start to finish to make it. Those mortar grooves is that a standard thing on frames then? That window I fished out the skip to look at how was put together, it had grooves I thought they were weathering strips, or thats what I thought they were called. The window board was jointed to the frame like the cill was too. I am familiar with the cill, jambs and header all forming one unit.
Ps how much did you flog the window for, if don't want to say, OK