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By mrpercysnodgrass
#1357026
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I have this bath panelling that needs stripping and refinishing. I'm not very experienced with modern finishes. Is there a quick drying water resistant finish that will apply by brush. The top section can be removed so I can do this in my workshop however the base section will have to be done on site and the job is an hour away from me so I want to restrict the travel time to a maximum of four hours.
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By AndyT
#1357030
It feels wrong giving you advice, but I would suggest Rustin's Plastic Coating. Despite the odd name, it can look very good and is properly waterproof and hardwearing. Two part finish and hardener. Rustin's say it's dry in two hours.

https://www.rustins.ltd/rustins/our-pro ... ener-gloss

Do search on here too for quite a few good threads.
By Glynne
#1357044
I seem to remember that Phil P (Pascoe?) is extremely knowledgable on this so either include him in the search or PM him. I think one of his posts was the reason I bought some to finish two boxes for 2 of my very young nieces - the finish being safe and very durable.
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By mrpercysnodgrass
#1357190
Thank you Andy and Glynne for those suggestions. I do have some rustins Plastic Coating which has been sitting on the shelf for the last five or six years. I bought two litres of it to do a job in that there London and it worked very well, I did then try it on a stripped piece and it did not work so well, i think because there were still traces of the old finish in the pores and that would be my fear with this job. I cant scrub the surface clean because it would ruin the patina!
I have used screwfix no nonsence trade varnish with great success in the past but cant think now what I used it on! I was thinking there might be a water based quick drying finish like that where I could get three or four coats on in a day then cut it back and wax it the next. But it would have to be guarenteed to stand up to the water and steam of the bath.
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By thetyreman
#1357228
I wouldn't know how to finish it, what about a marine/spar varnish? the bath looks amazing by the way, I love the copper on the inside.
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By Phil Pascoe
#1357246
Doug71 wrote:Can't help with the finish but have to say that is a lovely bath!


:lol: I was just about to say that that is probably the most hideous bath I've ever seen.
By Doug71
#1357252
Phil Pascoe wrote:
Doug71 wrote:Can't help with the finish but have to say that is a lovely bath!


:lol: I was just about to say that that is probably the most hideous bath I've ever seen.


You probably won't like my "Throne room" then :D :D :D

throne room.jpg
By Sgian Dubh
#1357346
mrpercysnodgrass wrote: I did then try it on a stripped piece and it did not work so well, i think because there were still traces of the old finish in the pores and that would be my fear with this job. I cant scrub the surface clean because it would ruin the patina!

If you're concerned about possible contaminants after stripping that might cause poor adhesion, you could perhaps use a single coat of dewaxed shellac as a primer under whatever finish you decide to use, which might be the Rustins Plastic Coating. I don't think I've ever used that product, but I think it is essentially a form of a melamine post-cat lacquer, normally sprayed, but in this formulation incorporating a relatively slow evaporating solvent allowing time for brushing on and for good levelling after that.

I know you'll know this already, so apologies for potentially insulting your intelligence, but I recommend a test of the shellac plus the Rustins Plastic Coating routine on some scrap contaminated offcuts prior to committing to something like this. Slainte.
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By mrpercysnodgrass
#1357606
Thank you for all your suggestions. I had a look on a couple of boat builder forums and the general consensus seems to be that good old fashioned yacht varnish still gives the best results, so I am going to stick with that. I had to have the quote in today so I have included alot of travel in the quote! If they go for it, it will mean driving from north Herefordshire to the Black Mountains, not such a bad way to earn money while driving!!
Richard, I liked your suggestion of priming with shellac, I had considered this and I could have done a test piece in the workshop. My only concern was, if things do not go to plan on site with a melamine finish they go very wrong indeed especially if silicon contamination rears its ugly head and I have very little experience with modern finishes. Epifanes and a quality brush it is.