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By Harbo
#643878
Pass - Around Latest:
(* Tried Out and passed on)

*Jimi43
*Condeesteso
*Promhandicam
*Proshop
Paul Chapman (with Paul at the moment)
Cutting42
Mike.C
Cambournepete
Wood master

Rod
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By Paul Chapman
#645558
I've just had a chance to try out the Liogier rasp. The Liogier is 11 grain and I compared it with my similarly sized Auriou which is 10 grain and a much smaller Auriou flat rasp, which is 13 grain. Unfortunately my camera is on the blink so I wasn't able to take any photos.

All three rasps performed exceptionally well. A good quality hand stitched rasp will remove material very quickly but in a controlled way. By varying the pressure on the rasp it's possible to work quickly but also to achieve a very smooth finish.

I found it very difficult to separate the Liogier and Auriou rasps in terms of performance. They are both superb and I would be very happy using either. They are, of course, quite expensive when compared with machine-made rasps but the difference in controllability and performance is well worth the extra cost in my view.

Many thanks for the opportunity to try out the rasp. I'll pass it on to Cutting42 ASAP.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
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By Harbo
#646374
Pass - Around Latest:

*Jimi43
*Condeesteso
*Promhandicam
*Proshop
*Paul Chapman
Cutting42 (with Gareth at the moment)
Mike.C
Cambournepete
Wood master
(* Tried Out and passed on)

10% Discount is still running.


Rod
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By cutting42
#646553
Hi All

I have had a chance to look at the Rasp this evening and it is quite a tool. My experience of rasps is minimal and confined to a very cheap set from B&Q that is considerably coarser than the Liogier. Nevertheless I will compare and contrast.

Some comparisons with the thug like B&Q special:

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A lump of unsuspecting pine:

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10 strokes of the B&Q with a fair bit of pressure

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10 strokes of the Liogier with light pressure boy can you feel it cutting!

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Rounding over B&Q

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Rounding Over Liogier

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More detail of the same

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B&Q rounding over on a piece of Walnut

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Liogier on same Walnut

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The cutting power is amazing and far better than I would have thought just looking at the grain of the Liogier Rasp, the coarser rasps must be like a belt sander. As you can see the difference on the pine is huge with virtually no shredding of the fibers just a beautiful cutting action. The difference is less marked on the Walnut and harder to see in the picture but the smoothness is in a different league and would take hardly any sanding for final finishing.

I will certainly be ordering a couple of these and will pass onto Mike
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By Jacob
#646573
I've got some of those B&Q rasps - they work well and are good value.
Not sure who would need the pricey Liogier offerings. I suppose it would be carvers and other specialists whose main-stream work would make them worthwhile. At 50 times the price it'd have to be worth it!
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By cutting42
#646628
Jacob wrote:I've got some of those B&Q rasps - they work well and are good value.


Agreed, which is why I have them

Jacob wrote:Not sure who would need the pricey Liogier offerings. I suppose it would be carvers and other specialists whose main-stream work would make them worthwhile. At 50 times the price it'd have to be worth it!


Anyone with the requisite disposable income who values a quality tool. It is far superior in its action and will provide a better finish and much faster than the B&Q rasp. If you can spend the time sawing away with the B&Q rasp then you can bask in the savings you have made.
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By promhandicam
#646708
Jacob wrote:Not sure who would need the pricey Liogier offerings.


Someone who could appreciate their superior cutting ability maybe? Because they are hand made they are the free hand rounded bevel of the rasped world as opposed to something sharpened using jig! Or to use another analogy you might understand think gransfors as opposed to wickes when it comes to axes. BTW, next time you see rasps in B&Q for 80p can you let me know :P
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By Mike.C
#646972
Just received the rasp from Gareth (cutting42) this morning. I will have a play with it over the weekend and post it to Cambournepete on Monday.

Thanks Gareth

Cheers

Mike
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By Jacob
#647086
promhandicam wrote:
Jacob wrote:Not sure who would need the pricey Liogier offerings.


Someone who could appreciate their superior cutting ability maybe?
I could appreciate their superior cutting ability (if that is what they have), but it's still only a rasp! I just wondered who would need a superior rasp - who are the uber-raspers? Who needs (would definitely benefit from owning) one? How do they compare to Surforms? I use both, but not very often. Usually for a quick clean up of mortices and/or tenons. There is a thing called a "float" (type of file) but I've never had the pleasure.
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By cutting42
#647094
Jacob wrote:
promhandicam wrote:
Jacob wrote:Not sure who would need the pricey Liogier offerings.


Someone who could appreciate their superior cutting ability maybe?
I could appreciate their superior cutting ability (if that is what they have), but it's still only a rasp! I just wondered who would need a superior rasp - who are the uber-raspers? Who needs (would definitely benefit from owning) one? How do they compare to Surforms? I use both, but not very often. Usually for a quick clean up of mortices and/or tenons. There is a thing called a "float" (type of file) but I've never had the pleasure.


Maybe you could try it? I am sure you can get added to the pass around list.

Maybe you don't mean them to, but your questions always seem to have a certain edge to them as if anyone who likes this tool is a little bit stupid and not a real pro like you.
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By Jacob
#647106
cutting42 wrote:
Jacob wrote:
promhandicam wrote:
Someone who could appreciate their superior cutting ability maybe?
I could appreciate their superior cutting ability (if that is what they have), but it's still only a rasp! I just wondered who would need a superior rasp - who are the uber-raspers? Who needs (would definitely benefit from owning) one? How do they compare to Surforms? I use both, but not very often. Usually for a quick clean up of mortices and/or tenons. There is a thing called a "float" (type of file) but I've never had the pleasure.


Maybe you could try it? I am sure you can get added to the pass around list.

Maybe you don't mean them to, but your questions always seem to have a certain edge to them as if anyone who likes this tool is a little bit stupid and not a real pro like you.
Well yes I am always a bit dubious about tooly enthusiasm - it's the value for money, not a pro or amateur issue!
But I was thinking about them because I have been making some big windows with 60+ joints. To get the thing together for a dry run, and apart again, it's essential to have all the joints a nice push fit. So I have been easing some of them with block plane, rasp, surform, chisel etc. A better rasp or float could be handy, albeit not essential unless they really are much better than the alternatives.

OK can I go on the list and have a go?

PS or maybe these jap rasps would be what I need, I don't know. topic49492.html
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By cutting42
#647127
Jacob wrote:Well yes I am always a bit dubious about tooly enthusiasm - it's the value for money, not a pro or amateur issue!


As I have mentioned before, value for money for a pro vs an amateur can be very different. Most amateurs never expect to recoup the costs of their hobby, it is purely a cost justification the same as buying expensive food vs Asda. Both will perform the job of sustenance adequately but the enjoyment of the gourmet food is worth the extra cost to some.

Same with tools, I get a kick out of using some nicely made tools that makes using them a pleasure and this rasp fell into that category.

I spend thousands on mountain bikes that many of my friends don't understand, they see a 120 quid full susser from Halfords and cannot see why you need anything else. Value is totally a subjective quality for an amateur.