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By Robbo3
#1259002
I need occasionally to move my AT1628VS lathe a few inches away from the wall to allow the headstock to rotate.

AT1628VS Lathe.jpg


I would prefer to lift & drag in one operation rather than lift & place the legs on skates, move, lift, remove skates then reverse the process to move the lathe back.

Anyone already cracked this problem?
By Jacob
#1259008
Leave a skate permanently under each end? Two bits of 2x3" with locating holes for the feet? Depends what sort of floor you have to drag it over I suppose.
User avatar
By finneyb
#1259018
Annotation 2018-12-29 104255.jpg
Place 4x2 or similar shown in red.
Lift and pull in the direction of travel. 4x 2 will rotate about the point on the floor .
You may have to re- level the lathe, but you may get away with it.

HTH

Brian
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By finneyb
#1259021
Alternatively, bolt a trailer jockey wheel to the headstock end. Wind it down to move.
Not as cheap as a piece of 4x2

Brian
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By Robbo3
#1259024
Should have said in my original post ..... floor is screed over concrete & space is tight. The head stock end is about 75mm from the wood burner so no access for a 4x2.

Like the idea of a jockey wheel especially if it's like a unicycle rather than a pivoting castor. Might even be able to devise a long bolt that screws down onto a skate.
User avatar
By CHJ
#1259029
lw.jpg
lw.jpg (4.1 KiB) Viewed 533 times


Can you fit 4 wheels (ex castors) to lift the legs to just clear of the floor and two jacking bolts on the front legs to lock it in position when moved.

I have a bench in my garage fitted with wheels that uses wooden wedges to lock the legs (lift the wheels clear) when in position. You might get away with wedges under the front legs rather than jacking bolts.
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By Robbo3
#1259129
I should also have said that space is at a premium. As I get older & wider I'm already knocking items on the floor as I squeeze through gaps that I used to pass through with ease. Losing 3" permanently is something I can't really afford.

Some ideas & their costs :

£74.40 Transport Rollers with Handle
Transport Rollers (£74.40).jpg
Transport Rollers (£74.40).jpg (9.42 KiB) Viewed 450 times


£82.80 - Mechanical Jack Set 1000kg Capacity
Jack Set (£82.80).jpg


There are also pivoting pry bars with rollers which are somewhat cheaper & could possibly adapted to suit.
User avatar
By Robbo3
#1259296
Other terms for searches are toe jack & toe claw. The claw converts a bottle jack into a toe jack. This has a lip on the side, often at the bottom allowing lifting from much closer to the floor.

Also farm jack. A high lift rachet jack with a botton toe.

Mobile bases have also been mentioned elsewhere on the forum :

Mobile stand by Steven M. Vaught
- https://vaughtwoodworks.wordpress.com/2 ... -and-such/

Mobile Bench - Popular Woodworking
- https://www.popularwoodworking.com/work ... ch-mobile/


I will probably end up with DeeJay's suggestion (thanks) of using a trolley jack.

I had passed over the idea worrying that any sideways movement would cause the jack to topple but I can add timber bracing to the legs that will cradle the pad (mine is flat with upward sloping ends - thus slippy) & also lower the jacking point.
User avatar
By Robbo3
#1260048
Update:
The lathe had crept sideways a couple of inches due to pulling it away from the wall & pushing it back on previous occasions.
Lifting the headstock end a few millimetres off the floor with the trolley jack inline with the lathe axis, allowed me to push it back to its original position relatively easily. Considering that I've been in considerable pain from suspected kidney stones, but diagnosed as muscle spasms, means that if I can manage it, almost everyone should be able to.

Thanks for all the suggestions.
User avatar
By Dalboy
#1260073
With what has been said about the room that you have I think that working on the lathe in such a tight environment is not the best of things to do and in some instances can be unsafe. If you can't afford to move the lathe out permanently because of such a tight space then I think you need to seriously look at how the layout of the workshop is done. Sorry to be so negative but you need good escape routes in case of problems.
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By Robbo3
#1260213
Dalboy wrote:With what has been said about the room that you have I think that working on the lathe in such a tight environment is not the best of things to do and in some instances can be unsafe. If you can't afford to move the lathe out permanently because of such a tight space then I think you need to seriously look at how the layout of the workshop is done. Sorry to be so negative but you need good escape routes in case of problems.


Derek, the problem is that all my static tools are mounted on wheeled storage units, ie bandsaw, chopsaw, planer thicknesser & shop vac. To use them, I have to juggle them around like a sliding tile puzzle. It's one of the problems of having a long but narrow concrete garage as a workshop
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By Robbo3
#1273509
I came across one of these dollys at Toolstation so I fashioned a wooden insert on which to stand a bottle jack.

Moving Dolly 1.jpg


I already had a block to increase the lifting height & a wooden ring to prevent damage from metal to metal contact from previous jobs.

Moving Dolly 2.jpg


This is much more convenient, to both use & store, than the trolley jack.