UKWorkshop Woodworking Forums




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: 28 Dec 2017, 11:52 
Offline
A Regular Member
User avatar

Joined: 02 Aug 2012, 10:52
Posts: 1326
Location: Bedfordshire
Has thanked: 55 times
Been thanked: 113 times
I sneaked out yesterday to do a bit of chair building. I've not taken a WIP series of pictures this time, as the processes are much the same as I've shared with you before - froe, axe, drawknife, pole lathe etc, and I don't want to bore you. The difference here is the style of back; I'm making a sort of harlequin set with common materials and elements, but each with a different back style. This one is for my wife, who likes a bit lumbar support, not provided by the spindle back and ladder back styles I've made so far. This one should be comfy for her, the back laths are steam bent to shape using a jig made to her measurements.

Attachment:
20171227_164401.jpg
20171227_164401.jpg [ 128.08 KiB | Viewed 528 times ]


Sorry about all the c**p in the background. The angle makes it look a bit wonky to me, but I assure you it isn't really !

One thing I wanted to show you is the joint between the back legs and the seat rails. We've discussed a few times how this is a site for failure in chairs, and the sorts of joints you might use in a jointed chair. Here, things are quite simple:

Attachment:
20171227_144647.jpg
20171227_144647.jpg [ 86.94 KiB | Viewed 528 times ]


The legs are 1 3/4" diameter, the holes are 5/8", bored with an auger and finished with a Forstner (in the hand brace) to get a bit more depth without the lead screw of the auger penetrating the other side. The depth is 1 1/4". The two holes intersect, but are offset by about 50% of the hole diameter. The side rails are fitted first, then the holes for the front and back rails are drilled through them. This means that the side rails are locked in place when the front and rear seat rails are fitted. Quite a conventional arrangement. You get away with it because the legs are straight grained, knot free, riven ash. The selected piece is fairly young regrowth from coppiced trees, about 5" or so diameter, which is more springy. This comes from near the base, with a natural curve which can be exploited to make the bending easier.

Just need to trim and finish the back legs at the top and bottom when it has dried a bit more, then on to seat weaving again.


Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Digg
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 28 Dec 2017, 12:25 
Offline
Settled in Member

Joined: 20 Aug 2011, 23:06
Posts: 528
Location: Wing, Bucks
Has thanked: 19 times
Been thanked: 42 times
Very clever detail that. Lovely chair.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 28 Dec 2017, 12:39 
Offline
Valued Contributor
User avatar

Joined: 11 Feb 2011, 23:12
Posts: 8288
Location: Leeds
Has thanked: 60 times
Been thanked: 548 times
When you say that the back was bent on a jig made to your wife's dimensions, how did you do this? Was it trial and error, educated guesswork or is it possible to measure for such a jig?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 28 Dec 2017, 18:14 
Offline
Valued Contributor
User avatar

Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 16:32
Posts: 9058
Location: Bristol
Has thanked: 619 times
Been thanked: 1177 times
Looks great. And it demonstrates the elegance of design these chairs have, where the details and dimensions work because of the material that has been selected and the way it has been worked.
Are you gradually filling your house with chairs or are the handmade beauties displacing more ordinary ones?

_________________
Andy


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 28 Dec 2017, 20:36 
Offline
A Regular Member
User avatar

Joined: 02 Aug 2012, 10:52
Posts: 1326
Location: Bedfordshire
Has thanked: 55 times
Been thanked: 113 times
The making to measure is made a lot easier by having already made a ladder back chair which is quite similar - same form for the back legs and the back slats of the ladder back are the same curve as the back rails of this chair. So I could get the "client" to sit in that one, and measure the height of the hollow of her back above the seat, and the depth of the curve needed. As a rule of thumb, 8" radius makes a nice curve for back laths.

Another comfort factor I got into a discussion about at the last Bodger's ball. A woman I was chatting with whilst looking at the chairs in the craft competition commented that, although it looks nice, an odd number of back laths puts one in the middle, where some sitters find that it presses uncomfortably on the spine. Sounded sensible, so I went with 4.

These chairs are slowly replacing an ancient Ikea black painted dining table and chairs; one more chair then it's the table...


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 28 Dec 2017, 20:47 
Offline
Settled in Member
User avatar

Joined: 20 Nov 2016, 11:36
Posts: 492
Location: North Hampshire
Has thanked: 64 times
Been thanked: 58 times
Very nice indeed. What are you going to do for the seat? Looking forward to the finished chair!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 29 Dec 2017, 11:17 
Offline
Valued Contributor
User avatar

Joined: 20 Aug 2008, 15:09
Posts: 5239
Location: South East
Has thanked: 227 times
Been thanked: 1251 times
Impressively tidy job.

=D>

How many hours work for the completed chair?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 30 Dec 2017, 09:21 
Offline
Regular Contributor
User avatar

Joined: 11 Mar 2011, 21:09
Posts: 1650
Location: Essex
Has thanked: 445 times
Been thanked: 154 times
Nice job so far! =D>

_________________
Dave's wooden stuff
Dave's metal stuff


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 31 Dec 2017, 16:08 
Offline
A Regular Member
User avatar

Joined: 02 Aug 2012, 10:52
Posts: 1326
Location: Bedfordshire
Has thanked: 55 times
Been thanked: 113 times
I've trimmed the legs, and cleand up a little. I'm waiting for the second coat of wiped on Danish oil to dry at the moment. Over that will go a beeswax/linseed/turpentine polish I've used on the other chairs it needs to match. The seat will be seagrass like the others too, but I have run out, so there will be a pause.

How long does it take ? difficult to know. As a dabbler, I do them in fits and stops. And I do the turning mostly at our greenwood meetings at Wimpole, so lots of chatting time. I reckon about one day making the turned parts, another for the back legs shaved to shape and steam bent. A day to assemble and oil, then an evening of seat weaving in front of the TV, followed by half an hour of vacuum cleaning the living room to preserve domestic calm. So 3 to 4 regular days. I reckon 2 is possible if I were to crack on, and especially if I were doing many chairs, so you could get a bit of a pipeline going. But it would spoil the fun.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 13 Jan 2018, 17:47 
Offline
A Regular Member
User avatar

Joined: 02 Aug 2012, 10:52
Posts: 1326
Location: Bedfordshire
Has thanked: 55 times
Been thanked: 113 times
The finished chair:

Attachment:
20180113_135330.jpg
20180113_135330.jpg [ 187.51 KiB | Viewed 148 times ]


I did the seat weaving on Thursday evening. It took me just under 4 hours to complete the seat, which is probably not terribly quick as I am no weaver !


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 13 Jan 2018, 17:57 
Offline
Settled in Member
User avatar

Joined: 20 Nov 2016, 11:36
Posts: 492
Location: North Hampshire
Has thanked: 64 times
Been thanked: 58 times
That's brilliant. I've got to admit that I've never been particularly taken by the look of weaving but that really does look nice. What is the weaving made of? Hazel? How do you shave it?

Lovely job.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 13 Jan 2018, 18:07 
Offline
Valued Contributor
User avatar

Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 16:32
Posts: 9058
Location: Bristol
Has thanked: 619 times
Been thanked: 1177 times
That looks really pretty!

Also very practical. Nice one.

_________________
Andy


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 13 Jan 2018, 19:22 
Offline
Valued Contributor
User avatar

Joined: 25 Sep 2005, 15:18
Posts: 3356
Location: North Hampshire
Has thanked: 52 times
Been thanked: 100 times
Nice work :)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 13 Jan 2018, 19:59 
Offline
Valued Contributor
User avatar

Joined: 20 Aug 2008, 15:09
Posts: 5239
Location: South East
Has thanked: 227 times
Been thanked: 1251 times
Superb job!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 15 Jan 2018, 11:16 
Offline
Regular Contributor
User avatar

Joined: 11 Mar 2011, 21:09
Posts: 1650
Location: Essex
Has thanked: 445 times
Been thanked: 154 times
=D> =D>

_________________
Dave's wooden stuff
Dave's metal stuff


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google Feedfetcher and 7 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
 Similar topics   Author   Replies   Views   Last post 
sam maloof low back chair

in Projects, workshop tours and past mistakes

andylee

6

808

18 Jan 2017, 23:31

Low back welsh chair build

in Projects, workshop tours and past mistakes

ro

101

3752

05 Nov 2017, 21:23

Joshua Klein's Banister-back chair

in Hand Tools

Sheffield Tony

6

277

31 Dec 2017, 16:44

Discoloured Oak chair

in General Woodworking

Manny

2

340

29 Mar 2017, 13:24

folding chair

in General Woodworking

phil.p

5

509

02 Mar 2017, 11:37


cron

Register UKW

User Tools






UKW Local

Quickly find the nearest tool suppliers & timber merchants in your area





Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
UKW Terms & Privacy