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By RogerS
#1199329
Dibs...your tale is all too resonant. I really have no idea why there are so many instances of this across the board. Not only with finance but utility companies such as EON. Are they understaffed? Are the staff so poorly chosen ? Or lack the intelligence to actually understand/follow-through/comprehend what they are doing Or is it that the staff simply couldn't care less ? Or too busy worrying about being snowflakes? Or desperate to check their Faecebook/Tweeter/InstantBanalGram/Grindr/Tinder/social-effing-waste-of-oxygen-media site ?
By lurker
#1199336
Although I have not had bank trouble, this is where a local branch occupied by folks that at least resemble humans can be challenged.
You cant blame the lower orders, but at least you can (with some dramatics) get to see a "manager".

Anyone who has worked for a large company knows the score: if you try to help, somewhere along the line you get your fingers burnt and sooner or later you stop caring and just tick the boxes. Or leave.

No customer services boss will say to the front line folks; "well done for using some common sense and sorting that"
It will be: " why did you spend 2.25 minutes more than allotted on that call" and "why did you veer away from your crib sheet".
By phil.p
#1199340
Jonzjob wrote:HSBC = Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corporation.
... It turned out that the staff were told not to tell any of the customers what HSBC stood for! A nice trust worthy way to conduct a business?


My wife worked for Midland/HSBC or thirty years and was not told that.
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By Eric The Viking
#1199362
phil.p wrote:
Jonzjob wrote:HSBC = Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corporation.
... It turned out that the staff were told not to tell any of the customers what HSBC stood for! A nice trust worthy way to conduct a business?


My wife worked for Midland/HSBC or thirty years and was not told that.


It obviously wasn't consistent: I've a friend of some 40+ years who's entire career was with Midland/HSBC, and was told something similar - I remember our conversations at the time.

I gave up on them when they were still Midland. I turned up at the counter to pay in a cheque with my new trading name on it (having already corresponded with the branch manager on the matter), only to be refused, with a queue of people behind me who could all overhear the exchange. They refused to check the account records when asked to verify what I was saying was correct.
By phil.p
#1199365
She and many others haven't a good word to say for HSBC - she got ther thirty year award and her redundancy in the same week. She works for Handelsbanken now - a slightly different kettle of fish. It's different when the people you're dealing with are paying fifty times what you're earning in tax - the care level is a bit different. :lol:
By Dibs-h
#1199386
I wasn't happy with the letter I got, the inaccuracies (Liverpool vs Wellingborough) and 2 phone calls, so rang back to speak to the lady who was looking into the complaint. This time armed with her direct telephone.

Got the "Liverpool" issue out of the wasy first and got an admission that she hadn't looked at the account for the address changes or anything else I suspect. Made it clear that the confidence levels in HSBC and their staff weren't going up but coming down.

I then stated I had only made one phone not 2. She then clarified that she'd listened to one call when I'd asked to be put thru to the Safeguard team at HSBC, but she could listen to the part of the call when I was speaking to the Safeguard team. So not 2 calls but 2 parts of a call.

She apologised for the confusion. I suspect the fact I was armed with my phone bills for the period in time might have something to do with things.

I then informed her - given I'd worked in Banking\Financial services for a large part of 2 decades, designed and worked on parts of some banking systems, I would be astounded if HSBC's systems didn't have an audit capability and the IT Security or Internal Audit teams couldn't have a report printed off that showed which UserID and hence member of staff changed the address in the first place. And then she could listen to the calls that the staff member took or made, 5-10 mins either way and see if he\she had been instructed by a customer to change their address and see how close the account nbr\sort code were to mine.

If the calls showed nothing, then further reports could show how many address or other changes this member of staff had made that subsequently were "reversed" or led to "complaints" of unauthorised activity.

I made it clear that I wasn't interested in being told that HSBC has strict procedures or policies in place as a quick Google would show the cases of bank staff who had been prosecuted for theft, etc.

I asked her to confirm by email what she was going to do. Had that sat in my inbox when I got to the office - she's ordered an audit report and should have that in 2 weeks. Then possibly know a little more.

I asked for the account number to be changed. Can't be done over the phone. Have to go to a branch. Not many left these days, so don't know how that's going to work. She said she'd emailed a business account person at the city centre branch, haven't had any call yet.

The only upside (possibly) is I could have 2 current accounts (both visible in the online portal), transfer stuff over and then close the original, all without needing to be set up on internet banking again. But that's the theory, so we'll see what the practice is.

I mentioned I was sick of spending time on the phone dealing with this as oposed to dealing with work issues and now they wanted me to go down to the bank - which wasn't happening on a working day unless they would take an invoice for my time. LOL..she couldn't repond to that. Got a "let's resolve the complaint sir and then we'll look into compensation." LOL - I spent the 50 quids worth of Love2Shop vouchers last night in Argos buying a new portable hard drive as I am on with some data recovery for some soul who had the last 10yrs of photos of his young children, no other copies and it went up the wazoo. Don't get me started on that. :roll:

Bizarrely enough, I'm more annoyed with that than the shenanigans at HSBC.

Just a waiting game now.

Dibs
By Dibs-h
#1199401
RogerS wrote:Dibs...your tale is all too resonant. I really have no idea why there are so many instances of this across the board. Not only with finance but utility companies such as EON. Are they understaffed? Are the staff so poorly chosen ? Or lack the intelligence to actually understand/follow-through/comprehend what they are doing Or is it that the staff simply couldn't care less ? Or too busy worrying about being snowflakes? Or desperate to check their Faecebook/Tweeter/InstantBanalGram/Grindr/Tinder/social-effing-waste-of-oxygen-media site ?


Roger

I'd probably pondered on such things in the past but only recently read of the following - The "Peter Principle" - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_principle and it struck me as probably describing a great deal of the people that fit in the categories you mention above.

That and a few other gems like

- "if there's an issue that could make things difficult\etc for someone and they are confronted, there's only 2 real choices, admit the truth or lie. Be prepared for most to lie."
- "if there's some kind of reward, financial, tenure or other, be prepared for the majority to lie."

It doesn't apply to everyone or to ALL - or anyone here :wink: - but it's applying to more and more people in life. Maybe a sign of the times or maybe it's always been this way but due to the instant nature of communications and the tinternet more folk are able to find out about other peoples experiences, which 10, 20, 30 or more years ago, you couldn't.

I'm defintely seeing more and more of the Peter Principle at work, at work so to speak. Astounding the ninycompoops that are in positions where a brain cell is actually required, but they don't seem to have one.

Incidentally I heard on the radio about H&M and it's hoodie - http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/hm- ... 49306.html - it was Radio 4. Yep I've joined that club now. LOL

Putting aside the specifics of the story - the presenter on R4 mentioned that there would have been a SPIM at H&M when the hoodie campaign would have been approved. A SPIM is a Smart Person In Meeting whom everyone either agreed with, were too scared to say anything or were on the same wavelength, i.e. full of it, so no one spoke up. The ad campaign got approved and the presenter said "I wouldn't want to be that SPIM now." LOL

I think it's a good acronym - SPIM. LOL

Might be old hat to some but something new for 2018 for me (in the formal sense)

- has it got my name on it?
- am I liable or responsible for it?
- is it going to directly affect me?
- did I make it or build it?

and simailar variations - if the answer is "No" - then couldn't give a fig about it. And no amount of management BS bingo is gonna change that. LOL

Dibs
By Student
#1199572
It’s not just HSBC that c*ck things up.

The Fine Arts society to which I belong has had an account with NS&I for over 20 years. The account, some £10,000, requires two signatories, out of four authorised signatories, for any transaction. A couple of years ago, our Treasurer got a letter from NS&I saying that, in accordance with our instructions, the account had been closed. Our Treasurer wrote back to say that no such instructions had been given to do this and, in any event, the monies hadn’t been credited to our account. Two reminders and several months later, they eventually said that they would investigate. Their initial response was that we must have told them to close the account until it was pointed out that, without two of the four signatories signing the request which they hadn’t, we hadn’t. Moreover, they wouldn't tell us where the monies had gone. It took 6 months before we were just told that the monies had been reinstated in our account and we were offered about £40 compensation; no explanation was given as to why it happened.