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By SVB
#1157981
Great post.

This is just the method I was taught when I did my box making with Andrew Crawford and is really worth the effort to to made a good box in the eyes of fellow cabinetmakers truly superb in the eyes of everyone.

http://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums/box-making-course-review-t32335.html?hilit=Andrew%20Crawford

http://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums/walnut-box-almost-finished-lots-of-pics-t36834.html?hilit=Andrew%20Crawford
By SteveF
#1157986
Thankyou Custard
Really appreciate your spent time on this

one question though, Is it attached to bare wood?
will the copydex stick to a finish?

Steve
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By custard
#1158005
SVB wrote:Great post.

This is just the method I was taught when I did my box making with Andrew Crawford


It's pretty much the same method I was taught when I first trained as an antique restorer and cabinet maker about forty years ago. The fundamental principle is that you almost never attach fabric or fine leather direct to timber, there are one or two small exceptions (such as the skiver to a writing table, although even there it's sometimes canvass backed). I've replaced silk drawer linings in Georgian furniture and found them wrapped around ancient book end plates and all manner of scavenged card!

It's also pretty much the method that's used today by the amazing craftsmen and women who fit out super yachts, which is one of the hot beds of high end British craftsmanship today. There's a developing design trend towards having fairly plain and unassuming furniture exteriors but with dazzlingly sumptuous interiors. I think we'll see a resurgence in elaborate linings and personally I'm very much looking forward to it.
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By custard
#1158007
SteveF wrote:Thankyou Custard
Really appreciate your spent time on this

one question though, Is it attached to bare wood?
will the copydex stick to a finish?

Steve


I always work on bare wood but I guess Copydex might stick to many finishes, I'd recommend testing first though.

The general principle with boxes is that you do all the finishing before lining, maybe a final exterior wax is left until afterwards but no more than that because getting finish on lining would ruin it. If there was a risk of finish getting on glue surfaces I'd normally just mask it off.
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By custard
#1158012
galleywood wrote:Custard

Could you please clarify the last paragraph of your second post with some pictures.
Thanks


If you look at the penultimate photo you can see the shiny band of double sided tape (after removing the backing band), and you can see the flap of suede waiting to be pressed down onto it. There are two ways of going about this. Firstly you can fold over the card (therefore pressing the double stick tape down onto the suede), or secondly you can fold over the suede (therefore pressing the suede down onto the double stick tape).

In a simple situation like that photographed my preference is to fold over the card. However, you will meet situations (for example the situation where you have an MDF strip on the card to support a lift out tray) where you have no choice but to fold over the suede. Consequently there's merit in practising folding over the suede even on a simple example like this. The key issue is this, suede (along with most fabrics that you'll likely use for lining) is stretchy, so much that it's easy to get creasing which ruins the job, that's why I emphasised starting in the middle and working out from there towards the two ends.

Hope that clears it up.
By galleywood
#1158015
Custard

Yes it does - thanks.
It was the reference to mdf to support a lift out tray that I could not follow.
Now I see it in the pic of the box with the green lining.
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By custard
#1158028
galleywood wrote:Custard

Yes it does - thanks.
It was the reference to mdf to support a lift out tray that I could not follow.
Now I see it in the pic of the box with the green lining.


Okay. Incidentally, when you're wrapping a lining around the "step" of the card and MDF support, I find it works better to approach it one "flat" at a time, I use a credit card to push the suede or felt well into the corner before laying it down across the next "flat". If you try it you'll instantly see what I mean.
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By thetyreman
#1158034
great article custard, as usual very high quality content and information, I will put it to use on my next box project.
By SteveF
#1158167
sorry to ask more questions, I understand your time is precious
how would you approach my situation of cutlery box?
I am thinking of a sort of dental molding to separate the knives forks etc

Steve
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By Garno
#1234635
Great post Custard and very easy to follow for a complete novice. How simple it will be to do remains to be seen, I now have my hides, copydex, card, green mat and rulers along with some double sided tape.

I have a question for you though,
Why use scalpels and not a Stanley knife? ( I don't have a scalpel ) Is it just personal choice? One thing I have learnt from your posts is that you very rarely include something that would not make a difference to the task in hand, therefore I can only assume there is some importance in using the scalpel. On the other hand I could be reading far too much into it and a Stanley knife would be fine.

Who was that man on the grassy knoll?
:D
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By Paul200
#1235324
Funnily enough Garno, I've just been lining a jewellery box. I've done this plenty of times in the past but always used a Stanley knife. Having read Custards sticky I used a scalpel instead and I found it to be far more accurate. A Stanley knife can snag the material you're cutting - presumably a scalpel is sharper so makes the job a lot easier. (The reason I have a scalpel to hand is because I had a mate who worked in a cartographic office and he gave it to me to use when I was making very tiny ships in miniature whisky bottles :roll: - they're not expensive though)

Paul
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By MikeG.
#1235327
I've been woodworking for about 40 years now, and I've never made a box! (Well, smaller than a blanket box, I mean). However, there is one on the distant horizon: a cutlery canteen. Can anyone offer any insights into the lining of a canteen? I mean, the outer lining as per custard's excellent instructions looks straightforward, but what about the fiddly stuff which actually holds the cutlery? In bought canteens this is covered in the same stuff the box is lined with, and I haven't a clue how I might set about doing that.