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By Sheffield Tony
#1227888
custard wrote:Regarding secret mitre dovetails. I have cut them, but only as a training exercise. I've never had a job where it might make commercial sense to incorporate them into a piece of furniture...and I probably never will! To sink a great deal of time into making something that's deliberately obscured from the client doesn't sit well with the parlous financial reality of custom furniture making.


When I saw the thread title, I thought that's what you would be making.

Without commercial pressure or the current fashion for exposed joinery, I have used them a couple of times in furniture. As a teenager I made some individual bookshelves with secret mitered dovetails to attach ends, which had keyhole plates to hang on the wall. The other was a HiFi stand with quite slim framing which also served as handles by which it could be lifted. In both cases, I wanted a strong loadbearing mitred joint. And a challenge :D
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By thetyreman
#1230813
hi, I finally had a go at it last night using some scraps of pine, it's not perfect and I didn't use a pairing block but for a real project I will take more care. Here's some pics
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By El Barto
#1235589
Bit late to the party but thanks Custard for such a useful thread. Tyreman, that first attempt is incredibly good. I doff my hat to you.

And definitely get some holdfasts! I have the Simon James ones (as does Custard by the look of it) and I can't tell you how amazing they are. They get used for absolutely everything.
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By Benchwayze
#1280182
Great thread Custard. The mitre always adds class to a dovetail.
Nice one.

John
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By Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz)
#1280374
Custard, I mentioned this when I posted a build in January this year (2019), that is, I read and re-read your to-do several times before attempting my first mitred through dovetails. The main difference between yours and mine was that you went pins first, and I went tails first. I wanted to thank you again here, but also provide a link to my article for those wanting to do it the “other way” :)

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/ ... able2.html

Later in the coffee table build, the table ends were rounded over. The effect of the mitred corners really enhanced the finished piece. This is the start of a joint which will now be used by preference.

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Regards from Perth

Derek
By Bodgers
#1281217
Super craftsmanship, love that mid century design as well, It reminds me of a similar piece done by "snedkersind" (on Instagram) a Danish cabinet maker...

https://www.instagram.com/p/BCvCblxp08K ... _copy_link
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By Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz)
#1281232
Bodgers wrote:Super craftsmanship, love that mid century design as well, It reminds me of a similar piece done by "snedkersind" (on Instagram) a Danish cabinet maker...

https://www.instagram.com/p/BCvCblxp08K ... _copy_link


I’ve not seen that before. Beautiful work. The technique I used looks to be the same - adding a curved fillet to the inside corner to create an even thickness when rounding the dovetails.

Regards from Perth

Derek
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By Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz)
#1312027
tomthumbtom8 wrote:I would like to know if I may what is the thinnest stock acceptable for a dovetail joint

its just a thought


I made this box ...

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... for a shoulder plane ...

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The sides were 1.5mm thick ... :)

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Regards from Perth

Derek