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By Rhyolith
#1199815
wallace and his Wadkin lathe (wadkin-rs-restoration-t109909.html) inspired me to make a thread specifically dedicated to my restoration attempts of my first large industrial machine. This kinda follows on from this thread: milling-machine-for-steam-engines-t108613.html?start=15 but all elements of the restoration will be covered here, will try to keep them in chronological order.

Its a Toolroom vertical mill, dating from the 1940s-50s: http://www.lathes.co.uk/milnesmiller/

This is what it looked like when it first arrived in my workshop:

ImageHenry Milnes Milling Machine by Rhyolith, on Flickr
ImageHenry Milnes Milling Machine by Rhyolith, on Flickr
ImageHenry Milnes Milling Machine by Rhyolith, on Flickr

First thing I did was wash it down with paraffin, rags, wire wool and wire brushes. Mainly just so I could see what was there! After that (which took a while) it looked like this:

ImageHenry Milnes Milling Machine by Rhyolith, on Flickr
ImageHenry Milnes Bradford by Rhyolith, on Flickr

Next started to examine it for mechanical issues. The first obvious issue was the table side to side movement was stiff, so started dismantling that.

ImageUnder the Bed by Rhyolith, on Flickr

This bearing was clearly stiff (possibly the problem) but I could not get into it without a specialised spanner for these nuts of a sort I have never seen before.

ImageTable Drive Nuts by Rhyolith, on Flickr

I think the required tool is a "hook" spanner... anyway I found this on eBay recently which finally allowed for progress!

ImageWillaims Adjustable Hook Spanner by Rhyolith, on Flickr

That worked and the whole winding assembly is not in bits, I think the nuts where actually the problem, they were too tight. All the same the whole lot will be cleaned and re-lubricated before re-assmbly.

That takes it to today, where I wanted to try and get at the winding mechanism for lifting the table, which is a tad stiff I think. Almost immediately I find a nut that needs another type of hook spanner... back to eBay :roll:

ImageTable Depth Adjuster by Rhyolith, on Flickr
By AES
#1199864
Very interesting Rhyolith. Those old bits of machinery were really good weren't they? But you've got some guts taking that lot on. Best of luck Sir, I envy you (I don't have the space), and admire your courage in taking that little lot on. All power to yer elbow mate.

BTW, just trying to be helpful, but I think your "hook spanner" is more properly called a "C" spanner. (And if the "slots" in the nuts that the spanner actually locates into are round holes, like I THINK I see in your last pic, then the spanner is called a "Peg" spanner). Not nit picking, but having the correct name may help you a bit with t'internet searches.

AES
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By wallace
#1203990
Very cool, I'm pleased I passed the bug on. That looks a lot more complicated than the stuff I do, take plenty of pics for future reference when your putting stuff back together.
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By Rhyolith
#1206630
Finally got an appropriate C Spanner/Hook Spanner/Pin Spanner (So many names for them!), so the second cranking assembly could come off.

ImageR0000007 by Rhyolith, on Flickr

A winding wheel was in the way, so thats also come off.

ImageTable by Rhyolith, on Flickr

The main lump still wouldn't slide off, so I started taking thing off to see what was holding it back. Removing the filthy gib strip confirmed it was the obvious thing. The power shaft for the table.

ImageR0000007 by Rhyolith, on Flickr

ImageR0000005 by Rhyolith, on Flickr

Took a few bits off to look at what was going on where the shaft meets the table, not obvious way of disconnecting it.

ImageR0000007 by Rhyolith, on Flickr

I am going to have to have another look, but it might be a case of taking it off the other end (from the main body) . If anyone has anyone suggestions or spots anything, let me know :) Think the manual would be useful right about now (hammer)

ImageTable by Rhyolith, on Flickr
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By Rhyolith
#1207320
There was a grub screw in there which I have removed. I cannot work out what its purpose was though as nothing seems to have got any looser. Mind there is a pin as well perpendicular to the grub screw, maybe it holds that? Will give it a tap.
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By Rhyolith
#1209852
Finally got one of the pins out, they were quite stubborn!

ImageTable by Rhyolith, on Flickr

As I suspected its filthy underneath, so given that a good paraffin rub.

ImageTable by Rhyolith, on Flickr

Now I can finally get at the up down mechanism for the table, which is stiff (hence all this effort). I have taken off the plate covering it, turns out its just some angled gears and a thread, simple!

ImageTable by Rhyolith, on Flickr
ImageTable by Rhyolith, on Flickr
ImageTable by Rhyolith, on Flickr

The whole mechanism was covered in dried grease, so I have soaked it in paraffin too.

ImageTable by Rhyolith, on Flickr
ImageTable by Rhyolith, on Flickr

I put the wheel back on to move it and its already feeling much better for the clean, think dirt was the problem. Will give it another go over before reassembly, mainly i want to make sure the nipples are clear for lube to get where it should.
By AES
#1209894
Coming along very nicely Ryolith. Like a couple of others I wondered why your couldn't just pull that splined drive shaft apart, but most importantly, you got there in the end, well done.

Isn't it "nice" how apart from being all gummed up with dried grease and general crud, it's clear that (perhaps) apart from a little wear here and there, the whole thing is going to be as good as new once you're done - easily capable of performing another lifetime of productive work. I think I mentioned it before, but I wonder what the inside of one of today's machines will look like when it's pulled apart after a 100 years?

If it was me, I deffo repaint it, but that's just me. I can quite understand why some people want to keep their old refurbished machines looking "clean but refurbished", but personally I'd like to "finish the job" by making it look all as near like "new" as possible. But as said, that's just a personal opinion.

Great work

AES