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By AES
#1199147
@ graduate owner. Thanks very much for the positive comments, much appreciated. I've been having a lot of (long-standing) extra back problems recently, and doing that piece at least allowed me to do a bit of "workshop-oriented" stuff without going in there (except to pic up bits & pieces to photograph)!

Thanks also for the comments re angle grinders. I agree with every word you say - I should have made a bigger point of the safety comments, but my post was getting longer and longer! As you say, they are/could be as lethal as a chain saw (even more so?), so thanks for emphasising.

About the safety nut, I've never heard of those, but don't actually have a 9 inch grinder (mine is only a 5 incher, and that's frightening enough!), but just as you say, I would NOT want to try that "clutch nut" in anger to see if it really does work :)

BUT, NOTE for all other readers, DO PLEASE be careful with the angle grinder/cut off disc combo because if you get that stuck in the kerf you could be in HUGE trouble!

What I did not say was about using eye protection (an absolute MUST) with an angle grinder.

BTW, in my pic of angle grinder cut off discs, the one in the top RH is a partly used disc. Just as you say, they do last well and aren't pricey (here anyway).

Thanks for telling that the Goscut is made by Eclipse, I'm not surprised, mine is really good. If you don't want the noise and mess of the angle grinder I suggest you unwrap yours and try it on sheet metal. I bet you'll be pleasantly surprised. :D

@TFrench. Thanks for the info re the Bosch "scissor" nibblers. Wish you hadn't told me though - now I want one even more (hammer)

Glad about the overall responses, thanks folks. It's nice to put something potentially useful back into a Forum which has given me so much help and incentive in the couple of years I've been a member.

AES
Last edited by AES on 09 Jan 2018, 15:37, edited 1 time in total.
By graduate_owner
#1199216
Hey AES, you are the one that deserves the thanks. You have created an incredibly useful, comprehensive and well written guide ( again) which many of us, I am sure, will refer to more than once. All credit to you.

Regarding eye protection, I have goggles, ear muffs, gloves and a leather apron and I have made myself get into the habit of putting them back in the same place after every use. That means when I need them they are always there, no need to search around so no excuse for not wearing them - so important. It's easy not to bother if it becomes a chore. I find a bungee cord is great for the leather apron - one side bent so as to be permanently fixed, and I can just hook the other end in the other side of the apron. Again, easy so no excuse, and much quicker than trying to tie a bow which turns into a knot if you're not careful.

K
User avatar
By Eric The Viking
#1199269
AES: You mentioned Abrafiles in passing.

I now guard the few I have left like my own children*. As long as I can get enough tension they're really good for curved cuts, especially in brass and aluminium. But unless some other manufacturer has sensed a market opportunity, I fear they're no longer available.

I only raise the subject again (I mentioned it once before, I think), just in case you've found a source of supply that I haven't heard about...

E.

* "He shoves them through metal and tells them all the while it's good exercise." Er, not exactly. More that I won't let them out to play with just anyone. Er, perhaps I should find another simile...
By dickm
#1199270
AES wrote:Thanks for the comment about those little nibbler crescents dickm. I did point it out in my post (1st time I used mine I ended up unknowingly treading loads up into the house on the soles of my shoes. I weren't 'arf popular with SWMBO!), but it's good to have someone else reinforce that message

Oooops. Should read more carefully. :oops:
User avatar
By Eric The Viking
#1199271
As someone who bought one when Axminster had them on offer a few years ago, but hasn't yet used it, I consider myself duly warned (by both of you) :-)
By AES
#1199275
@graduate owner. Thanks again, glad it is useful, I find that when I write such long stuff I find myself wondering if anyone's going to be interested.

I haven't got a leather apron (most of the stuff I do tends to be smaller-size - aeromodelling background, and all that - but I should buy one.

BTW, if your Forum handle is because you do own a Graduate (Colchester) then I HATE you!!! (Even if it is "only" a Student I'd be dead jealous - not that I've got the room for either of course). :D

@ETV: No I have no "magic Abrafile store" - haven't seen any in the shops for many a long year. Just like you the few (long and short) that I own are guarded jealously. You're right, VERY good on curves, and not really all that much sweat required (mostly). :D

@dickm: NO problem, really. It was a lot to take in all at once, and as I said before, those bloody little crescents are a real problem, so to have someone reinforcing that message is definitely no bad thing.

Thanks again all.

AES
By AES
#1199277
A P.S to graduate owner: Re safety gear, I DO have eye protection (big visor) and gloves, but rightly or wrongly (referring back to another recent post by Eric the Viking on noise), although I have ear defenders I use them very seldom. Rightly or wrongly I've decided that having ruined my hearing years ago (unprotected against jet engine noise - but NOT at full power I hasten to add!) I seldom bother. Probably should wear them more though - the nibbler and cut off discs are probably just as damaging as the router (when I usually DO wear them)

But I do like the leather apron idea.

AES
By -Matt-
#1199513
TFrench wrote:If you do a lot of sheet metalwork in thin gauge, we've just invested in a couple of these at work:
http://www.bosch-professional.com/om/en/cordless-metal-shear-gsc-10-8-v-li-226567-0601926175.html
Absolute game changer. Incredibly controllable and neat, very little distortion on the workpiece. Overkill for DIY'ers, but it may help somebody!


I'd say not, it wouldn't last very long in a proper sheet metal shop so it's no use for that either! :P Might be nice with a bigger capacity. We have an old (probably 80's!) Bosch nibbler that manages 1.5mm stainless just fine and it's no bigger than a standard jigsaw.

Regarding the clutch nut on a 9" grinder.
Yes.
They do work.
By NazNomad
#1199515
AES wrote:No I have no "magic Abrafile store" - haven't seen any in the shops for many a long year.


I can't remember seeing one since the 1980's. I suppose the modern equivalent is the blade sold to cut ceramic tiles?
User avatar
By custard
#1199576
Whenever I cut out small squares from a saw plate or a card scraper for scratch stock blanks, no matter if I use a hacksaw or snips, they generally end up with slightly rippled edges, which then means a lot of flattening on a diamond stone to get a mirror surface.

How would you go about this task, with the objective of keeping the blank as flat as possible?

Thanks.
User avatar
By CHJ
#1199581
I usually sandwich thin stock between more robust sheet or hardwood when cutting, then likewise between hardened stock (hardened silver steel or case hardened MS strips) to file down/draw-file any edges that need dressing.

Even cut strips for marking knives off a sawplate on my horizontal bandsaw with a hardwood support under it.
By AES
#1199586
Hullo Custard, only just seen your Q, sorry.

Yup, +1 for what CHJ says, plus maybe a couple of other ideas.

Q's if I may:
1. Have you got a scroll saw in your shop - or even a fret saw or jewellers saw (frame/s)?
2. How hard is this stock you're trying to cut (roughly, I don't need a number, but say, like a bit of stainless? Or even harder/tougher)?
3. Roughly, how thick?
4. How often do you need to do that job?

Depending on your answers (sorry, I'm not familiar with the stock you mention), I'll answer tomorrow (bedy byes time here now, sorry).

AES
By TFrench
#1199590
-Matt- wrote:
TFrench wrote:If you do a lot of sheet metalwork in thin gauge, we've just invested in a couple of these at work:
http://www.bosch-professional.com/om/en/cordless-metal-shear-gsc-10-8-v-li-226567-0601926175.html
Absolute game changer. Incredibly controllable and neat, very little distortion on the workpiece. Overkill for DIY'ers, but it may help somebody!


I'd say not, it wouldn't last very long in a proper sheet metal shop so it's no use for that either! :P Might be nice with a bigger capacity. We have an old (probably 80's!) Bosch nibbler that manages 1.5mm stainless just fine and it's no bigger than a standard jigsaw.

Regarding the clutch nut on a 9" grinder.
Yes.
They do work.


Obviously if you're doing heavy work it's not going to be up to it. We have an old bosch one for heavier stuff as well. For on site trimming or cutting out patterns in the workshop I can assure you it's much easier than gilbows. Most of our stuff is >1mm aluminium or stainless and it's ideal for that.

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