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By Mike Jordan
#1334361
Don't be tempted to use float glass or any other non safety glass, look at the glass and glazing federation guidelines. An adult can be seriously injured by a breakage of glass in a door, just imagine what could happen to a child!
Only a fool would take the risk to save a few quid.
I use 6.4 laminated glass for use in boat furnishings but I have been offered 4.4 thickness lam in the past.
Anyone working commercially should also think about the insurers reaction to any claim.
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By woodbloke66
#1334402
MikeG. wrote: I agree with Rob, above, on the proviso that the glass isn't within reach of toddlers.

That's the only caveat Mike and thus far, no toddlers have been near the cabinets. I'm just wondering though how vulnerable are my two Japanese floor lamps with shoji paper panels? :lol: - Rob
By Mike Jordan
#1334405
Sorry about the rather strident tone in my last post but this is a frequent area of irritation to me. I always quote in advance for work and frequently get a return email suggesting that using float glass rather than lam will show a saving. On most of my products it would! But only a saving of about £20 on a £500 item, truly a false economy.
By Doug71
#1334416
I am surprised that anyone would recommend anything other then safety glass, it sounds like the panes will only be narrow but I would still use 4 mm toughened glass. Open doors get knocked, doors get closed on to things that are protruding out of the cabinet, doors can fall open if you move the cabinet etc. Toughened glass has a stamp on it to show it is toughened but you can request a furniture mark instead which is just a line.

MikeG. wrote:Horticultural glass has often been used as a substitute for "antique" glass. It has more imperfections in it, and has the added bonus of being cheaper than ordinary glass.


I used to use horticultural glass in windows to look like old glass but I find the modern horticultural glass is not as clear as it used to be, it often has a slight milky haze to it (from my supplier anyway).
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By MikeG.
#1334417
Doug71 wrote:I am surprised that anyone would recommend anything other then safety glass, it sounds like the panes will only be narrow.......


Everyone thinks that "safety glazing" in the Building Regulations means either toughened or laminated. Well, it doesn't. There are other ways of showing compliance, one of which is to have small panes. From memory, there is a maximum width of 250mm and a maximum area of something like 1/2 a sq metre to fall within the category of "small" for the purposes of safety glazing. That's surprisingly big. If it is good enough for a house door, then it's good enough for a cupboard door.
By Doug71
#1334419
MikeG. wrote:
Doug71 wrote:I am surprised that anyone would recommend anything other then safety glass, it sounds like the panes will only be narrow.......


Everyone thinks that "safety glazing" in the Building Regulations means either toughened or laminated. Well, it doesn't. There are other ways of showing compliance, one of which is to have small panes. From memory, there is a maximum width of 250mm and a maximum area of something like 1/2 a sq metre to fall within the category of "small" for the purposes of safety glazing. That's surprisingly big. If it is good enough for a house door, then it's good enough for a cupboard door.


I think from memory it has to be 6mm which could be a bit heavy depending on the cabinets, although if it is going in a groove to match some 6mm MDF panels could be perfect!

The thing I like about toughened glass is the nice rounded edges that you don't cut your hands on when you are fitting it :)
By LBCarpentry
#1339257
MikeG. wrote:Horticultural glass has often been used as a substitute for "antique" glass. It has more imperfections in it, and has the added bonus of being cheaper than ordinary glass. I agree with Rob, above, on the proviso that the glass isn't within reach of toddlers.


Horticultural glass is what I have always known it as also
By Geoff_S
#1339341
It’s interesting the reference to horticultural glass, bloody nasty stuff. Coincidentally I have just ordered a new greenhouse and all the glass is laminated.

I used to be a toddler a while back, and I don’t remember it being any more painful cutting myself back then than it is now :?