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By Jacob
#1334785
Trevanion wrote:
Jacob wrote:Not a common sight nor a common knowledge in my neck of the woods. Fashionable Georgian towns maybe? I have worked in posh Georgian houses but always with sashes.


It might be the case that you don't see them in that neck of the woods, doesn't make it any less of a French-style piece of joinery, why are you being impertinent about how they should be made if you have no real experience of them?

I'm not saying how they should be made but I am saying that what the OP was talking about was not traditional French windows. I have had experience of making them, but in France.
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By Trevanion
#1334788
Well, Jar944 is from the states where there are some heavily French-influenced areas where these sort of things are quite prevalent, it doesn't have to be in France to be classed as "French-style".
By Doug71
#1334818
Ah, see what we are talking about now, here's my attempt at something similar last year, made of Accoya with a lovely big shiney espagnolette bolt on the inside.

Before

french door 1.jpg


After

french door 2.jpg


Definite improvement!
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Last edited by Doug71 on 06 Feb 2020, 00:35, edited 1 time in total.
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By Trevanion
#1334824
Doug71 wrote:Ah, see what we are talking about now, here's my attempt at something similar last year.


I've done a few "Juliet" balconies like that now, typically with glass rather than ironwork though. It's surprising how common having a door in the upstairs part of the house is and I've never really found a definitive answer for why which might suggest it was for a few reasons, the main one that gets suggested is lugging heavy and awkward goods up to the second floor like furniture or sacks of coal back in the day, another was that they didn't have internal staircases so that an extra occupant could live upstairs privately without disturbing the occupants below, the best suggestion I heard was that it was there so you could get on your horse easily first thing in the morning without having to clamber up on top of it, simply walk onto it's back and sit down in the saddle :lol:

These days the Juliet balconies make for a handy fire escape on paper.
By Jar944
#1334827
Jacob wrote:When you said "traditional" french window I didn't spot the inverted commas!
Where did your drawing come from? Very unfamiliar - French Canadian or something? The graphics look pre WW2. Did WBMcKay do an American edition?
"French windows" in UK means either actual French windows as found in France, or UK style glazed patio doors usually outward opening and not remotely French in any way at all - though they did open inwards in some Edwardian houses.


In the US "french door" or "French casement" is just a generic name for a double unit with no fixed center mullion. Casement windows are not all that common in general here, and double are rare.

The drawing is from this 1922 book
cu31924004589549_0000_copy_1116x1398.jpg
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By Jar944
#1334828
Doug71 wrote:Ah, see what we are talking about now, here's my attempt at something similar last year, made of Accoya with a lovely big shiney espagnolette bolt on the inside.

Before

french door 1.jpg


After

french door 2.jpg


Definite improvement!


Looks great.
By Jar944
#1334829
Trevanion wrote:Well, Jar944 is from the states where there are some heavily French-influenced areas where these sort of things are quite prevalent, it doesn't have to be in France to be classed as "French-style".


We call all double doors that swing "french doors"

We certainly have French influenced areas, though in this case this window is going into a Dutch colonial style house (no idea what you would call it if that doesn't make sense) in a predominantly Scotch and Irish settled town.