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By ED65
#1339746
I've been hoping against hope that we'd eventually be able to do this safely and it appears we can now, we're either in the sweet spot or the problem has been rectified permanently =D>

So, does anyone have any sharpening questions they've been holding off asking about?
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By Trevanion
#1339750
Funnily enough, I was also wondering if a thread like this could actually be put up on the forum now without it devolving down into petty arguments, slagging off and eventually being locked.
By AES
#1339753
Serious Question:

How do you easily/quickly flatten an oilstone (both sides) that's developed a dip in the middle over the years due to the regular use of an Eclipse honing guide please?
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By Phil Pascoe
#1339757
I needed a new bread knife, so I did some research. Looking through custmer reviews, I found one cracker - Do NOT buy this knife. It's a waste of money. It's already started to go blunt and I've only had it for three years. :D :D
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By Trevanion
#1339758
AES wrote:Serious Question:

How do you easily/quickly flatten an oilstone (both sides) that's developed a dip in the middle over the years due to the regular use of an Eclipse honing guide please?


I’ve got a cheap faithfull 400/1000 diamond plate which I think I paid £20 for, it’s flattened both an India stone and a Washita stone in pretty quick time. You could use something pretty hard like silicon carbide paper, particles or even diamond particles on a glass plate which might do it too.
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By Ttrees
#1339761
Guessing an angle grinder would be the quickest.
Rubbing a hone off the wall is not fun.
I sorted mine out with the edge of a non laminated plane iron and a block of wood, as I needed to scrape a composite material.
It works fairly quickly.
Glad to be able to get rid of the edges without wastage.
Plane irons make great scrapers (EDIT: without drawing the burr) if the job calls for something rigid, like dressing bandsaw tires.

I've got a question...
Who uses water on their stones?
What should one expect after using it with oil?
Last edited by Ttrees on 04 Mar 2020, 12:45, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
By transatlantic
#1339762
If you have a very small secondary bevel (~1mm), is there really any need to work up the grits? Can't you just always go back to the highest stone? that is of course until the secondary bevel gets too large.

Rob Cosman can seemingly get an amazingly sharp edge from 1000 (diamond) straight to 16000 (Shapton), and also Paul sellers something similar, although 1000 (diamond) straight to leather strop.

I assume the only reason they start off on the 1000 is to keep the secondary bevel consistently small, as opposed to letting it grow and then having to shrink it back down every once in a while.

It seems as though with this practise, you only ever need two stones.

A medium stone to maintain the primary bevel (which does nothing other than keep the secondary bevel small)
A fine stone to actually sharpen the secondary bevel

...and then perhaps a very coarse stone for new tools, or damaged ones
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By MikeG.
#1339765
phil.p wrote:I needed a new bread knife, so I did some research......


Just about the hardest thing to sharpen, I reckon. Luckily, they don't need to be very sharp to work.

-

So here's a question. How wide does your secondary bevel have to get before you start weighing up a tertiary bevel?

Follow up question. How many bevels do you need before you round them all over into one big curved bevel, as I think Sellers does?

Another question: does anyone else hone flat primary and secondary bevels, yet strop as though the bevel side of the blade was curved?

Final question: does anyone else not put a secondary bevel on a plane blade, using only one bevel?

And finally finally: how long would this thread have lasted in the Jacob era?
By AES
#1339772
Can't answer your other Qs MikeG, but to answer your Q: "And finally finally: how long would this thread have lasted in the Jacob era?"

My answer, we wouldn't have got as far as this before "someone" put "someone else's" back up and the manure started to fly. Missed, but IMO, only in a positive sense. Good decision by whoever to apply in whatever however it happened! :D

Re the using the angle grinder, was that answer addressed to my Q about flattening an oilstone? If yes, I don't quite see how to do that - what disc/wheel, & how to get it flat (on the stone's face) please?
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By Phil Pascoe
#1339774
Nelsun wrote:Obviously, when flattening your stones, it's clearly best to do it with two push sticks; three if you were born with an extra arm.


Nonsense. You'd be hollowing flat ones with push sticks. :D
User avatar
By Phil Pascoe
#1339775
MikeG. wrote:
phil.p wrote:I needed a new bread knife, so I did some research......


Just about the hardest thing to sharpen, I reckon. Luckily, they don't need to be very sharp to work.


I had a Victorinox I was given about thirty years ago as being serrated the chef who owned it thought it impossible to sharpen once blunt. I just sharpened the serrations off, until when it disappeared at the end of last year there was nothing left of them - it was like a ham knife. I blamed the boy for taking it to university but as he pointed out - he doesn't eat bread that needs cutting.
I bought the 12" version of this - which seems fine - it's dangerously sharp at the moment, time will tell.https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mercer-Culinar ... 270&sr=8-1
By dannyr
#1339778
I've used an angle grinder (with cheapo diamond offset face grinding wheel, 100mm), to make a whetstone from a nice, hard, fine -grained piece of rock found on a beach - looks just like a Charnley stone, but won't be. Works very well as a waterstone - shapeless on all other faces, but flat on the one. I finished off with rubbing on flat wet'n'dry paper and in the trad way, set it in plaster in a base.
If you do this, please grind wet and wear a mask. And don't take all the pebbles on the beach.