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By Wurm
#1304770
This is the top section of a stable door that I have cut and is ready to glue together. I am guessing it should be clamped from one arch to the opposing corner unless anybody tells me otherwise.

It is only the second item that I have made out of wood, the first having been an airing cupboard, so any thoughts on how best to bond it will be appreciated.
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By MikeG.
#1304771
With such a pronounced arch I would start with a ratchet strap around the whole thing, with suitable corner protection. I'd also be using sash cramps........carefully.
By rafezetter
#1304772
Have to say pretty impressed if that really is only the second thing you've made from wood - you've definitely got a talent for it.

Seems MikeG beat me to it.

I'm assuming you've got something inside those butt joints for the middle and ends of the arch; like a biscuit or domino or... something?
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By marcros
#1304847
It depends what clamps you have. I think that I would use glue blocks, because I hate ratchet straps with a passion.
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By AndyT
#1304856
I too am impressed that a beginner has managed something so ambitious. Although I have never needed to make such a door, if I did, I'd want to follow the traditional construction and use hammer head tenons. Although it looks complicated, this method has the big advantage that the joints are tightened up by wedges, meaning that complicated clamps on the arched part are not needed.

Image

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hammer-headed_tenon
By Argus
#1304898
Here's an example of a hammer-head joint.
It is a door at Plas-Glyn-Y-Weddw in North Wales.
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By Adam9453
#1304901
Based on where you’re upto I’d just glue some temporary blocks on so you can use a sash cramp to pull it tight without any issues, just be careful when you remove them
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By ColeyS1
#1304910
Adam9453 wrote:Based on where you’re upto I’d just glue some temporary blocks on so you can use a sash cramp to pull it tight without any issues, just be careful when you remove them
Sound advice!


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By Wurm
#1304992
I bought some of these clamps for the job:

https://www.bahco.com/en/p/plastic-hand ... -d9-9b-3b/

The arch is connected with a double mortice at each end and a block of wood to connect them (I think that is a biscuit?). I should have asked on here for advice before now since none of the books I read mentioned a hammerhead joint.

Ratchet straps I am familiar with, but when I did an online search for 'glue block' every return talked about something for wood turning, so I am not quite sure how that would work.

Two more questions:

I have procured an old glass table top as a flat surface to glue it on, should I put down some wax paper or equivalent so the door does not get stuck to the glass? Should I also use it around the joints if I use a ratchet strap?

One of the tenons in the base is too narrow for the mortice (I made a mistake on the cut), would mixing some sawdust and chippings with the glue help to fill the gap?

Your time to reply is appreciated.
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By Pete Maddex
#1304999
Glue a shim to the loose tenon and pair it to fit, we have all done it.

Pete
By dzj
#1305000
Wurm wrote:
The arch is connected with a double mortice at each end and a block of wood to connect them (I think that is a biscuit?). .

If you're using biscuits, I think you should consider using some other joinery method.
I'll assume that you're using floating/ loose tenons. You could go without clamps completely and glue one side and when it dries, drawbore and glue the other.
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By TheTiddles
#1305001
If you can stick to glass with wood glue, you deserve a prize! However thin plastic is my go to, old plastic bags, bin bags, cling film etc...

As for the gappy tenon, if the gap’s more than a small fraction of a millimetre, use a thin bit of wood like veneer, it’ll also match better if it’s visible

A
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By Trevanion
#1305014
Wurm wrote:I should have asked on here for advice before now since none of the books I read mentioned a hammerhead joint.


What books are you reading out of curiosity? There seems to be some interesting joinery going on with your door I haven't really seen anywhere else.
By rafezetter
#1305016
Wurm - for the glue blocks what they mean is something like this:

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/pin/176766354098993858/

There are two common types - reusable removable ones that are clamped to the work first then the angled clamp applied after, usually for repeated work.

The second is little more than a wedge that has been cut to a corresponding angle from the other angled face you wish to clamp and then glued onto the workpeice for clamping - once the clamping has been done and the glue dry - it's then cut and planed off.

In your case you take a sliding bevel and take a reading setting the body of the bevel so its sitting on the end of the arch mitre joint and angle the bevel part to match the average of the arch angle.

Then you get a bit of scrap large enough for your clamp head and cut it to that angle, and then glue it to the side of the door frame roughly in the middle - ensuring that the angled face you don't glue is the correct one and should be approximately parallel to the arch curve - also making sure it's not so low the clamp face can't reach it - you want to try to get the clamp face as close to the middle of the stock on both peices as possible or uneven pressure could lead to the inside glue joint being tight and the outside having a gap.

I'm not explaining it so well.... this might help you get the gist:

https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1AS ... APmd-2iA08

It is pretty straightforward... but remarkably complex to explain without a good reference ! :)

Basically you're trying to make a block so that when the face of the clamp sits flat on the arch - it has a corresponding bit of wood on the side of the door stile opposite that matches the angle of the clamp face as it is presented.

Grab a clamp and put the bottom face roughly in the middle of the arch, then look at the top head and the angle of the clamp face in relation to the side of door stile - that's the angle you want to replicate in a block of scrap wood.

err hope that helps?
By Wurm
#1305191
This is the connection between the two sides at top of the arch, the other connections are similar. If the double tenon, if that is the right term, is not big enough I could still cut something longer.

If I am understanding it right, a glue block is made a of a soft wood and glued onto the arch so as to provide a clamp point, and then when it is removed the soft wood should rip apart leaving the oak intact. I have some thinking to do there.
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