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By Trainee neophyte
#1305415
Your test for olive oil: fry an egg in it. If the egg tastes nasty, rancid and unpleasant it is probably not (entirely) olive oil. Would you believe that olive oil is the only product in the EU that doesn't have to be pure, to be sold as pure. (Italians were a founder member of the ECC). If your oil bottle has "Bertoli" on the label, the chances of finding anything that may even have been close to an olive tree are slim.

Good olive oil should leave a burning sensation in the back of the throat - a teaspoon of really good oil should make you cough. Of course, really good olive oil (like mine), costs an arm and a leg. I get paid €2.50 a litre for it, and you buy the same oil for close to £20.00 a litre. Such is life.
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By Benchwayze
#1305416
Trainee neophyte wrote:
you buy the same oil for close to £20.00 a litre. Such is life.


Crazy! :ho2
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By Trainee neophyte
#1305420
Benchwayze wrote:
I am all ears ref changes to lifestyle. (once I can walk properly again) So by all means enlighten me. And point me to a carbonara recipe? :D

John :)


The lifestyle change is so simple, it is never going to catch on, as there is no money to be made.
Eat one meal a day. That's it.

Eat once, and for the next 22-23 hours, consume zero calories. Really zero. No milk in tea, no snacks, no food of any kind, then after 24 hours, eat whatever you want. Seriously, whatever you want. You're not on a diet, you are not calorie counting, and you need to eat your entire day's food requirement, all in one go. I tend to have a 3 course meal, totalling 2,500 -3,000 calories. That is a LOT of food. Fruit to start, whilst I'm cooking (usually a bit peckish at this point), then lots of main course, most often with chips, because we grow our own potatoes, and our own olive oil, although sometimes we use lard, because we grow our own pigs. Followed by yoghurt and jam, or an icecream, a bit of chocolate - something sweet, anyway.

The plan is to then give your body 23ish hours to get your insulin level to drop, before you eat again. Any food, with the exception of pure fat, will cause your insulin level to rise, and being diabetic, insulin is the problem. You can go mad and fast for a week, but that doesn't sound like fun, although it would probably fix your issue all in one go (i'm not a doctor, so take advice before believing random internet weirdos about not eating for a week!).

If not eating for 23 hours sounds too hardcore, build up to it slowly. Start with dropping one meal - breakfast would be favourite. You are now automatically fasting for 16 hours, without even trying. Slowly close the gap between meals - over weeks, or even months. Do what works for you, and don't diet, because it's no fun at all.

Just my 2pworth of free advice - you get what you pay for? I would recommend investigating further, as there are loads of ancillary health benefits that go with it, that may help with your current issues. I need to stress "may", as I am a farmer, not a doctor.
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By Trainee neophyte
#1305423
Benchwayze wrote:
Trainee neophyte wrote:
you buy the same oil for close to £20.00 a litre. Such is life.


Crazy! :ho2


Just the nature of farming. Almost all food is produced at or below the cost of production. Farmers survive on subsidies. Insane, but that's how it is. This conversation belongs on a different thread, but we don't want to go there, probably...
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By Benchwayze
#1305427
Just thought of a number of reasons to agree. We don't want to go there!
I am taking a squint at the video link. Seems my bread making has to be curtailed somewhat to dispose of the sugar that's trapped in my system, whilst not adding more.
That's going to be a non-starter then!

John (hammer)
By Dibs-h
#1305463
Benchwayze wrote:As a type 2 diabetic I am not supposed to eat too much starch. I realise bread is fattening, so I just take it easy, but the metformin I take daily helps process the starch and insulin excess, so it's a case of sense and sensibility!


My uncle was Type 2 until January this year. His weight over the years had increased to about 120Kg. Realisng he wasn't going to change without help, put him on a 900 calorie diet with walks slowly increasing from "round the block" a few times a day to now doing 4 miles.

Over a year - his weight has dropped to 90Kg with the loose target being 80Kg. About halfway thru (i.e. 6 months in) when his weight had dropped to about 95Kg - the GP confirmed he was no longer Type 2.

I do recall reading over the years that visceral fat, especially round the trunk, i.e. the gut can significantly increase the likelihood of Type 2 - especially if you have a genetic propensity for\to it.

I think anything like alternate day or 5-2 or similar type of alternate fasting could be worth a try.
By Dibs-h
#1305466
Trainee neophyte wrote:The lifestyle change is so simple, it is never going to catch on, as there is no money to be made.


Yep. - 100%.

Trainee neophyte wrote:Eat one meal a day. That's it.


I think the "hard" bit is finding something that works (even if slowly getting to it) and sticking to it.
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By Trainee neophyte
#1305471
Dibs-h wrote:
Trainee neophyte wrote:The lifestyle change is so simple, it is never going to catch on, as there is no money to be made.


Yep. - 100%.

Trainee neophyte wrote:Eat one meal a day. That's it.


I think the "hard" bit is finding something that works (even if slowly getting to it) and sticking to it.


Couldn't agree more. Whatever works, is what will work for you. No point being evangelical about something that no one else can cope with. Keto diet springs to mind as a good example - no carbohydrates ever again just isn't going to work for me - what about pie?!

Mmm....pie (homer)
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By Benchwayze
#1305519
Fatty liver precedes obesity (or insulin intolerance). e
Which is why I think it's type 2 beginning its work, unsuspected, that causes the obesity.

Just an idea. Anyhow when I can get home, and prepare my own food, I am going back to low carb.


John :D
By Dibs-h
#1305524
Benchwayze wrote:Fatty liver precedes obesity (or insulin intolerance). e
Which is why I think it's type 2 beginning its work, unsuspected, that causes the obesity.

John :D


Not sure tbh but I think losing weight once a person has it, has the potential to cause type 2 to go into remission.

Given the issues type 2 can cause, I'd be willing to lose weight, if overweight, to be free of type 2.

If for whatever reason that didn't happen, I think it would still improve health tho.

Not calling or suggesting anyone is erm chubby.
By Dibs-h
#1305525
Benchwayze wrote:Just an idea. Anyhow when I can get home, and prepare my own food, I am going back to low carb.

John :D


What are your thoughts on not necessarily going low carbs, but perhaps upping the % or amounts of complex carbs and/or low GI ones of the current amount of carbs?

Dibs
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By Benchwayze
#1305526
The nil carb period lasts about three weeks for me. I introduce simple carbs like green veg then. Generally I don't miss spuds in a roast dinner, I thought I would but not really. I do allow myself a roastie now and then on special occasions, Just as I do have one dinner a year with Jersey Royals and lamb! I miss bread as it precludes the sandwiches I enjoy with salads and ham or tuna.
By phil.p
#1305533
Type two is certainly a bit of a bummer when it does its worst -
DSCF0127.JPG
:D
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By whiskywill
#1305897
Trainee neophyte wrote: The recipe: 4 things go into bread, water, strong flour, yeast, salt. I use 500g flour, 300g water, half teaspoon of salt and 15g (standard packet from Lidl) of yeast.


Unless you are using something different, Lidl packs of instant yeast contain 7g, just like all other manufacturer's, and not 15g.