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By Falcon
#1322253
Good afternoon everyone.
This is my first post so bear with me!
I have just got hold of a Bradson no.3 pillar/bench drill which I am wanting to restore.The problem I am having is that I cant find out anything about this drill on the 'net' can anyone kindly point me in the right direction please?
I will post a picture of the drill when I can.
A previous owner has rigged up a grinding wheel to it,on the side opposite the hand wheel so that when the hand wheel is turned both the drill and the grind wheel turn, which could be useful but does anyone know what was there before?
I intend taking it apart cleaning the parts and then putting it back together - are there any pit falls that I should look out for?
Hope that all makes sense.
All the best,
Kev,
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By AndyT
#1322295
Falcon wrote:Not sure if this helps but the drill has a patent number on it - 225961.
Kev.


That number leads here which might be useful (diagram, description)

https://worldwide.espacenet.com/publica ... 961A&KC=A#

Grinding wheel is original equipment!
By Falcon
#1322323
Here is a picture of the drill.
Image
The grinding wheel can clearly be seen.Now knowing that the grinding wheel is an origen feature makes this unit more interesting than I had at first thought.
The spring looks wrong and will have to be replaced.
Kev.
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By AndyT
#1322330
That looks like a fun project and a really useful tool.
From my very limited experience rehabbing an old hand drill is just stripping down, cleaning and reassembly.

A wipe over all the cleaned up metal with some thinned down boiled linseed oil can preserve old paint, prevent rust and keep everything clean.
By Falcon
#1322401
Here is a photo of the grinding wheel side of the drill - the bars and the u bolts securing it to the pillar frame is what made my think that it had been cobbled together.
Image
Andy - thanks for that ,its good to know that the restoration should be a straight forward task --for a change! I will be doing an oily rag finish to the drill.
Kev.
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By AndyT
#1322410
Ah I see what you mean. Maybe a casting broke and was mended creatively.

What's going on with the chuck? Do you have an old chuck with a new one fitted into it? It looks a bit odd and a bit long.
By Bod
#1322419
I think the bracket for the grinders tool rest, has broken off and been repaired creatively.
The chuck may be being held in a collar, which will allow larger "blacksmiths" drills to be used, directly into the collar, once the chuck is removed. Father's Union drill had this feature, most useful for larger holes.

Bod
By Falcon
#1322476
I think you guys are right about the grinders tool rest.
On looking more closely at the chuck I think that you are right Bod.On the collar there is a square headed bolt which when undone allows the chuck to come away,the spindle on the chuck has a flattened surface on one side and when it is pushed into the collar the bolt tightens up on it thus holding it in place and stopping it turning.I think that this would work for drills pushed dirrectly into the collar as well.
I am looking forward to learning more about this drill as I progress with the cleaning and restoration.
Kev.
By Bod
#1322517
When stripping down, there will be at least one grub screw in the gear cog that drives the chuck around. Behind the grub screw is the square, drive slot running up and down the main shaft. The grub screw has a square end, which WILL NOT turn in the slot. Slide the shaft out of the cog, grub screw untouched. There will be another grub screw like this in the feed ratchet drive.

Bod
By Falcon
#1322625
Hi Bod.Thanks for that pointer - I would have tried to undo the grub screw so that has saved me a lot of grief!Anything else I should look out for?
Kev.
By Bod
#1322681
The nut/s at the very top, should be tight enough not to have any lift, but loose enough not to bind on the feed screw.
There's not much to these drills that isn't obvious, but I've never seen one with a grinder.
Must be a knack to turning the main handle, whilst sharpening a drill on the stone!

Bod
By Falcon
#1322845
Hi Bod,
Thanks for that - a straight forward restoration will make a welcome change!
I will have to figure out the best way to turn the drill wheel and use the grinding wheel at the same time - at first sight this seems a bit dificult to say the least!
I managed to grab a few moments this afternoon and took the chuck off and freed it up.The springs that go between the 3 jaws that tighten on the drill bit are missing - anyone know where I can get replacements from please?
Kev.
By Bod
#1322860
Try ball point pens!
Other than that, spring suppliers, you need 3 identical sizes, length/diameter/number of coils/strength.
Spare parts as such, are not available, you will have to make do or mend, hence some of the previous repairs on the drill.
As a thought, there were chucks that didn't use coil springs, or springs at all! Its unlikely you have one of these, as they were mostly on smaller hand drills, but could have been made big enough.

Bod