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By SammyQ
#1313652
That Rutlands one looks interesting. It would certainly help once you got to within 1-2mm of final dimension. Until you work out how many mm's vertically a turn of the handle equates to, it's easy to over-cut... #-o
There is not such a problem.when roughing down, so the 'ballpark' linear scale suffices there.

Sam
By SammyQ
#1315181
The DW733 is a really well made machine. Bloomin heavy though.


I'd fight its corner by saying 'that is no bad thing, considering the masses of some of the baulks I've put through it'.
My Douglas Fir benchtop went through as separate 8" x 4" x 7' laminated pieces, each being lightly planed on the two 8" faces as finishing after glue-up. Despite having infeed and outfeed tables rigged from sawhorses etc, I was still VERY glad of the gravitas of the DW733 keeping it steady and immobile in the face of the considerable moment of force exerted by each baulk.
In similar vein, gang-feeding (3 at a time, side-by-side) of smaller stock is equally possible, floorboards in my case. This ensures more uniformity of section thickness, by negating leverage from one board on one side of the bed. It also helps spread wear.

I loved my Big Yalla Monsta, and still hanker after it, despite the increased versatility and refinement of my present HC260 from Electra Beckham, the well known wood fashionista...

Sam
By PaulR
#1315235
Apologies if this is a daft question, but how do you use a thicknesser without a planer? Does the timber already need to be dimensioned ?


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By sunnybob
#1315257
PaulR wrote:Apologies if this is a daft question, but how do you use a thicknesser without a planer? Does the timber already need to be dimensioned ?


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The americans call them lunch box planers, (no, dont ask why) theres plenty of references and pictures online to show you how they work.
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By SamTheJarvis
#1315429
SammyQ wrote:
The DW733 is a really well made machine. Bloomin heavy though.

I'd fight its corner by saying 'that is no bad thing,


Definitely, I perhaps begrudge it as I haven't a place for it to live yet, so it gets lumped around whenever it's needed hah.

Err, somewhat related is the fact a company called Byrd Tool do custom spiral cutterheads that fit the DW733, which is a unique plus. We've got one on ours and, while it was expensive, it's probably saved us an equivalent amount in time sanding by now, and still on the original cutting edge of the first set of inserts.
By SammyQ
#1315443
I was debating a Byrd head when my woodworking needs changed, and I went for the Beckham, sorry Beckum instead. Good call!!

Sam
By Student
#1315465
Re Sammy Q’s comment that “Until you work out how many mm's vertically a turn of the handle equates to, it's easy to over-cut... “, one extra feature of the DW733 is an adjustable gauge on the handle. Each turn of the handle equates to 1.5 mm and a gauge on the top has markings at 0.0 mm, 0.5 mm, 1.0 mm and 1.5mm. Do a cut, set the gauge to zero against the mark then crank the handle until the 0.5mm etc. lines up with the mark and the cutting height is reduced by 0.5 mm or whatever. Due to the diameter of the gauge, it’s quite possible to adjust the depth by 0.25 mm or even less.
By SammyQ
#1315500
Yup, though I found this method a little inconsistent, possibly because the disc on my handle was worn, and therefore loose and slipped a little(?). Could also have been my clumsiness! Despite that it was a very good method to get to 'inside the ballpark ' measurements, as experience allowed you to judge degrees of rotation of the handle equals millimetric fractions of cut as Student says above.
For ultra-sensitive depths of cut, I would 'sneak up' on it, using conventional measurements of the board outside the machine.
Rootin'tootin' bit of kit, dependable, rugged, powerful. Loved it.

Sam