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By AndyT
#1207197
Pete Maddex wrote:
AndyT wrote:


If that makes a racking problem, I have a pack of offcuts of plywood and thick card, bolted at one corner and free to swivel on the bolt. I can select enough of the pack to equal the thickness of the wood being held, and place it at the opposite side of the vice. I learned the idea from one of Alf's posts on here years ago. I'll post a picture if I can find one. Someone else showed the same thing recently but I can't think who it was.


Was it me?

ImageTriming feathers by Pete Maddex, on Flickr

Pete


Yes it was!

Thanks Pete. Well worth making.
By MusicMan
#1207208
After decades of having a vice inset to the bench, I saw some solutions where the back jaw is proud of the bench (Paul Sellers, one of Steve Maskery's videos). So I tried it with a bit taped on and liked it a lot for ease of holding something when you put it in the vice. So then I went fancy. The vice is a Paramo.

vice - 1.jpg


I've had it in use a bit over a year now, and wouldn't go back to the flush arrangement. Like Andy, I also like a long jaw to hold awkward things.

Keith
By powertools
#1207224
The vice you need very much depends on the layout of your workshop and the type of work you do.
I have 2 record vices fixed to my bench but they never seem to be in the right place for many jobs. I also have 4 Zyliss vices that with modifications l have made are far and away my most used tools for any holding or clamping operations that I do.
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By G S Haydon
#1207230
Bodgers, you've had some solid ad"vice" 8)

I still stand by my experience that as an all rounder, the QR is the best. We've recently made a workbench, no photos on our website yet but you can find some photos on our facebook page https://www.facebook.com/GSHaydon

In reference to back jaws flush vs projecting , it is simply down to preference. The most pleasing thing I see in the photos of people set up is the time taken to cover the metal parts. The only thing I differ on regards preparing the vice compared to most others is not having such wide overhanging wooden jaws. I feel it puts strain on the vice and reduces how effective the clamping is. However! Clearly the people who do are happy with it and it's easy to try.

I was glad of a projecting vice jaw the other weekend when I was making a table with a friend. I was preparing some 3400mm x 350mm x 44mm sections of ash for glue up (it's going to be a monster table) and having the projecting jaw meant I could get my hands around the vice much easier. But, don't overthink this stuff, if something like a vice jaw doesn't work for you change it.

In regard my videos, blogging etc, I gave it a break due to health reasons. I started to have tonic-clonic seizures in early 2016 and although better, I had another in October last year. Trying to put out good content takes time and although it was fun, I had to draw a line under it and focus on the things that really matter. My family, job and me.

My broad advice is don't overthink and read too much. Get to it and have some fun.
By Bodgers
#1207257
G S Haydon wrote:
My broad advice is don't overthink and read too much. Get to it and have some fun.


Thanks for replying.

I keep telling myself to do the above, but will some much info around, it is easy to get sucked in.
By MusicMan
#1207270
phil.p wrote:What is the benefit? I can't see any.


Then there probably isn't one for you, Phil. I've found the following:

1. As Bodgers said, ability to get your hand round work when putting it in the vice. Surprisingly useful, especially as one's hands get weaker.

2. Ability to clamp something that has a thicker part beyond the bit held in the vice. Doesn't sound much but it's been handy with the odd shapes in harp building.

3. For the width of the jaw, ability to hold an assembly (eg a frame) centrally in the vice.

4. For the wide dog holes aligned with holes on the bench, ability to clamp something a bit wider than usual.

5. Occasionally, cross-cutting something held in the vice without sawing the bench.

As usual it depends on what you do. The above have all been useful for me, but I am not trying to say they are right for everyone.

Keith
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By nabs
#1207284
although ultimately a matter of preference, one argument in favour of starting out with a flush mounted vice is that it is easy to experiment with the alternative arrangement by adding a temporary rear jaw to see if you like it, whereas going the other way round is much less convenient.
By undergroundhunter
#1207287
I use a record style QR vice but mine is not flush with the face of my bench, this means I can get my fingers between the work piece and the bench (really helpful when putting things in and out of the vice), I have found a downside and that is when I have been dovetailing wide boards say 24" wide there is a lot of flex in the work piece as its not supported by the edge of the bench. I found a temporary solution was to make a long block that was a tight fit between the back of the piece and the bench and clamp the end furthest away to the edge of the benchtop. I will get round to making a moxon vice one day.

Matt
By phil.p
#1207290
nabs wrote:although ultimately a matter of preference, one argument in favour of starting out with a flush mounted vice is that it is easy to experiment with the alternative arrangement by adding a temporary rear jaw to see if you like it, whereas going the other way round is much less convenient.


I just replied but my post disappeared into the ether.
Exactly. You can always space the work away from the edge/apron with a bit of scrap, whereas you can't bring it in closer if you use a deadman or mounts on the apron or far leg.
By richarnold
#1207303
I decided to make a new bench about a year ago now and as a working joiner, I could not see any improvement on a record quick release, but I also wanted the bench to look traditional, and have as little metal exposed as possible. the whole vice face was enclosed with an oak jaw which is 2ft long with the far end supported with a sliding wooden bar.
Image
Image
By Bodgers
#1207372
Wow! I would have never have thought of

a) completely enclosing the front jaw
b) adding a second guide rail (making into a super Nicholson style vice)

That's an interesting idea...
By memzey
#1207539
Having used said bench I can confirm it works a treat (even if the vice is at the wrong end for a right hander). Richard’s bench is also bigger than most by quite a margin and has a couple of great little touches that make it stand out; like the turn buttons which act as planing stops and the easy access storage at either end - genius.