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By Toby29
#1200004
Have been offered a bench made of Ruberwood. Whats that any good do I need to treat it.It has a single line of square dog hole and will have 2 metal dogs.My question is if I want to extend dog holes whats the best way to do this.Also, shall I stay with square metal dogs or go for round dog holes.
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By MikeG.
#1200012
You don't need dogs at all. If you like the bench, have it. A freebie is never to be sniffed at, and you can generally adjust them somewhat to suit your own circumstances (or can simply be used as a source of free wood), but don't make any decisions about a bench, ever, based on bench dogs.

I have square bench dogs for my (free) bench. I'll use them once or twice a year at most, and wouldn't miss them if they were gone. The holes can be useful, and can be a nuisance. If I were starting from scratch I wouldn't bother.
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By Tasky
#1200030
You mean make the existing ones larger, or add in extra dog holes?
Extra ones I'd either just use a drill/brace or chisel them out like chopping a mortise. Much the same for enlarging them, really.

Square, round, probably doesn't matter so long as the dogs are the same shape.
But as Mike says, you don't actually need them and a simple sash clamp in a face vice will do a lot.
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By ED65
#1200049
Toby29 wrote:Have been offered a bench made of Ruberwood. Whats that any good do I need to treat it.
Rubberwood is wood from rubber trees. It's not exactly high on the list of woods that people pick for benches but it is a hardwood so if it's put together well there's no reason it can't work well.

It's not clear if this is a commercial bench but if it is it's likely got some finish on it already. If it is bare you can wipe on some BLO, Danish oil, dilute varnish, paste wax, paint the legs, or do nothing at all to it depending on preference.

Toby29 wrote:My question is if I want to extend dog holes whats the best way to do this.Also, shall I stay with square metal dogs or go for round dog holes.
Well I would go with round holes all day every day and twice on Sundays. Square holes are IMO obsolute.

While the argument of how easy new round holes are to add (just drill, relieve top edge and you're done) isn't enough to be swaying, the greater utility of round holes should be. Everything a square dog can do a round dog can do, and much much more besides because whatever goes in the hole (and there are many more options with round) can be rotated to an infinite number of angles as and when needed.
By MusicMan
#1200065
Holdfasts are a fantastic argument for round holes. Generally though, they would be used further back, so no need to fill in your square holes.
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By Tasky
#1200093
ED65 wrote:Square holes are IMO obsolute.

Which could be a typing error, or a genuine portmanteau meaning 'absolutely obsolete'... and you don't get more obsolete than that!! :lol:

OP, have a look on YouTube for pop-up bench dogs.
Could be of interest to you...
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By ED65
#1200139
Regrettably just a <stupid fingers!> typo. It would have been a brilliant portmanteau word had I intended it!
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By Tasky
#1200167
ED65 wrote:It would have been a brilliant portmanteau word had I intended it!

Well I did try and throw you a line...
Quick, edit your post before anyone sees!!
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By Tasky
#1200419
Mr T wrote:Why the downer on dogs? I can't imagine using a bench withoiut them.
Chris

Not really down.
I agree with the seemingly general consensus on this board that they're not in any way necessary... But I'm also a fan of having options, so hope to have a bash at the pop-up ones at some point!!
By JJ1
#1200461
Hi,

My bench is made of Rubberwood. It was originally a very large and heavy table that cost me all of a fiver. I made it into a workbench and I've been extremely happy with it. The top was thickened with an additional 38mm of MDF so it's roughly 100mm thick now. It's very heavy and absolutely rock solid. My 'workshop' is a small external balcony, so the bench lives permanently outside.
I made it 3 1/2 years ago and apart from the obvious signs of fairly heavy use (cosmetic) it's as good as new. I originally gave it a thorough soaking with wood preservative (probably not necessary, but I was naive and over keen :) ) and a couple of coats of Osmo Teak Oil. I gave it a further top up coat of Teak Oil last month, but it certainly wasn't essential. The bench is out in all weathers and it's only protection is a couple of cheap tarpaulins that cover it whenever it's not in use. It's held up really well and I'd surprised if it will need replacing in my lifetime.

I went with 19mm round dog holes so I could use a variety of accessories, i.e. clamps, holdfasts, etc. I considered square or round holes and have absolutely no regrets going with round. I started them all off with a 19mm straight router bit and finished them off with a 19mm Wood Beaver (I think that was the name) drill bit in a cordless drill.

A few pictures; Before, after, oil finishing and as it is now after lots of use.


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By phil.p
#1200465
I added dog holes a few years ago when I bought a pair of holdfasts on a group buy here. I wouldn't be without them now, even with a bench top with a gap down the middle for clamps and no apron (same reason). All I would say is to round the edges over with a router to save any splitting or heave around the holes and to think before drilling the holes whether you wish to bolt anything else down - if you wish to bolt down a grinder, drill stand, morticer or whatever space the holes to suit them, it's not that critical where they are for normal usage (obviously not too close to the edge).
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