Moderators: Random Orbital Bob, nev, Noel, Charley, CHJ

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By phil.p
#1196208
Chris, another option of course is to keep an eye out for something half decent second hand, it doesn't need to be your ideal lathe but if you buy at a sensible price you can shift it on without losing much - once they're used they're used.
By Chris152
#1196214
The more I think about it, the more that's perhaps the way to go. If I found something with enough clearance to allow me to develop skills to turn up to a 12 inch plate, then it would be time to move on. The thing about electronic speed control and swivel head is only really about the ambition to do large, potentially wobbly pieces and that's got to be a way down the line. Something like the Axminster lathe that recently sold on the forum for £150 could have been perfect! (hammer)

Thanks Phil.
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By CHJ
#1196220
Chris152 wrote:The more I think about it, the more that's perhaps the way to go. If I found something with enough clearance to allow me to develop skills to turn up to a 12 inch plate, then it would be time to move on. The thing about electronic speed control and swivel head is only really about the ambition to do large, potentially wobbly pieces and that's got to be a way down the line. Something like the Axminster lathe that recently sold on the forum for £150 could have been perfect! (hammer)

Thanks Phil.



By no means an ideal world but it's surprising what's possible with care on a very basic setup.
By Chris152
#1196269
CHJ wrote:By no means an ideal world but it's surprising what's possible with care on a very basic setup.


Thanks for the link, Chas - that looks a hell of a lump of wood to work with, and a great result. It must be tricky turning that deep inside a bowl while maintaining support? Tbh I wouldn't even know how to set about splitting the log in the first place - lots to learn here!

I'm pretty convinced that a cheaper, used lathe is the way to start but need to find one that'll fit on a home-made bench (so I can store a vac and other stuff underneath) and has reasonable clearance for plates.

Thanks again

C

edit: whatever lathe I get, I really want decent dust extraction from the outset. Would you say this coupled with a cowl is suitable?
http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-ho ... eal-717658
It moves 2000m3, which looks good to me.
By Dave Brookes
#1196383
Chris, before you go spending hard earned cash at Axminster, check if Vale Woodturners have a Club account with them, I set one up for the Didcot Club and there was 5% off lathes and 10% off accessories. You may get your club subs for the year back with one purchase! Just a thought.

Dave
By Chris152
#1196515
Blockplane wrote:You have the Cardiff branch of Axminster close at hand. Find out when the turning demonstrations are on, good chance to talk not only to the demonstrators, but to fellow woodturners. I think you are allowed to play on some of the display machines?


I missed your post earlier, Blockplane. I went into look at the machines in Axminster yesterday, no demos for a little while but it was useful - I was surprised how long some lathes are (eg the AWVSL1000), way more than I need for a plate! Their Trade ones offer shorter versions but don't have a swivel head til you pay much more.

I also went to Data Tools which is nearby to look at the Records and they had the Coronet on display - like the CL3/ 4, they're shorter which is better for a small workshop.

If I could find a used one with the right specs I'd buy it now, but til then I think I'm just going to look for something cheap with some clearance to learn on.

Thanks

C
By Chris152
#1196516
Dave Brookes wrote:Chris, before you go spending hard earned cash at Axminster, check if Vale Woodturners have a Club account with them, I set one up for the Didcot Club and there was 5% off lathes and 10% off accessories. You may get your club subs for the year back with one purchase! Just a thought.

Dave


Good point, Dave - I'll ask next week, and if they don't have the arrangement i'll suggest it! C
By Tony_A
#1196646
If you want information on dust extraction I would suggest that you have a look at Bill Pentz's site.
I don't have permission to post links so you can google "Bill Pentz cyclone".

Another good resource is the Australian woodworking forum which has a sub forum dedicated to dust extraction. Have a look at the thread by Bob L describing modifications to a 2 hp dust extractor to get adequate air flow. Google "the generic 2 hp dc"

Tony
By Chris152
#1196681
Thanks Tony - I'll check both out. Just out of interest, do you build dust cyclones in the opposite direction down your way? :)

I've been looking on the usual sources and can't find a lathe that fits the bill yet. Patience, I know. But saw this in Axminster a couple of days ago:
http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-ho ... the-505021
Electronic speed control and 12 inch diameter, maybe I could sell it on after 6 months (once I have one, I'll work pretty hard to learn to use it) for a £100/ 150 loss. Would the chuck etc fit the Record CL4 if I upgraded to that in due course? That said, it is a bit odd that the controls on the Record would be hidden behind a big bit of wood in case of emergency stop, as some of you have noted.

The rationale for buying twice would be that with a cheaper lathe to start I'd find out if I was any good at it and if I like it without too much outlay. Plus, weighing just 40 kg I could easily wheel it outside when using and delay buying more dust extraction if I wanted to go that way.
By phil.p
#1196689
This is an easy, cheap way of sorting out an emergency stop if you can't reach the switch with the head turned (excuse clutter) -
DSCN2473.JPG


The power comes in through the switched cable outlet on the far end where it can be switched off if necessary when long hole boring then on through the switch in the middle which can be reached easily no matter where the head. It has to be restarted at the head switch, but restarting it isn't the problem.
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By nev
#1196696
Chris152 wrote:...Would the chuck etc fit the Record CL4 if I upgraded to that in due course? ...


probably not.

The spindle thread size (that the chuck fits to) could be one of half a dozen common sizes. Unfortunately the spindle size may change across the range of a single manufacturer too, so you can't say Axminister's have X and RP have Y thread.

You can however buy chucks with threaded inserts so if you change lathes you simply buy an insert to suit the new one, a lot cheaper than replacing the chuck and jaws etc.
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By CHJ
#1196707
Chris152 wrote:Electronic speed control and 12 inch diameter, maybe I could sell it on after 6 months (once I have one, I'll work pretty hard to learn to use it) .


How many platters over 12" diam. do you envision making?
What are you going to use them for? or Where are you going to sell them to?
Where are you going to source suitable blanks from?
How much do you envision having to pay for the blanks?

Think you need to think hard about the above questions before you make large diameter pieces your rational for selecting a lathe.
By Chris152
#1196713
Thanks all.

Phil - well, that's one less thing to worry about, looks like a good solution.

Nev - that's good to know - it makes a stronger case for skipping a new one to learn on and then buying another new one possibly with different size attachments.

Chas - I think I can answer those questions ok (I'm sure you don't need to know my answers, but they go from pretty certain (a friend is a tree surgeon, but I'm not remotely pretending to know what to do with the wood!) to probably (I know the art market reasonably, but that one's never anything like certain)).

I really appreciate all your guidance in this.

C
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By nev
#1196719
If its any help at all, and you go the used route...

I've only ever had the one lathe, a Record Power CL2 36x18 (an older blue one). These lathes have two round bars as the bed and you can, if limited for space, cut the bars down and make it as short as you like. The gentleman I inherited from used it in a 6x4 shed along with all the other paraphernalia associated with turning. To make life a little easier he chopped the bars by about a foot so my 36" bed is now only 24" but thats more than I'll ever need. The 18 in the model number is the maximum recommendation for diameter (with the head swivelled through 90º ). The thread on the headstock is 3/4 x 16. So it may be worth keeping an eye out for a used CL2 or 3. It will cover everything you want to do as long as your not strapping tree trunks to it :)

This is an old listing on eBay for a CL3 36x30 which looks the same as my CL2 but probably has a bigger motor to deal with the 30" max diameter. Both that one and mine have the optional bowl turning attachment (replaces the standard support at the head stock end)

prod_000957_asset_0_1457440310.jpg


So you could turn everything from tiny to large. Everything shown in my 'not a blog' was turned on my CL2 including..

2014-03-28-09-51-08.jpg


to this (12 or 14 inches is as large as I've ventured)

blue-bowl.jpg


all with same tools too.
By Tony_A
#1196819
Chris152 wrote:Thanks Tony - I'll check both out. Just out of interest, do you build dust cyclones in the opposite direction down your way? :)


We have to because motors spin the other way down here.

I wasn't in a hurry when I was looking for my lathe and watched the used machine sales for about 6 months before getting a good reasonable priced machine.

Tony