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By AJB Temple
#1234238
Beautiful quality work and a superb instructive thread.

These things are funny - I see work like this and think of myself as just a butcher in comparison.
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By Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz)
#1234293
AJB, you're very kind, but the truth is all woodworking is just working to lines. And when you miss them, as I am often apt to do, being able to make it look like you didn't - that I'm good at! :D

Regards from Perth

Derek
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By custard
#1234295
An absolute triumph Derek.

=D>

Any idea how many hours it took in total?

Incidentally, I agree with the decision to go for wooden drawer pulls, but if you're ever faced with the same challenge of producing multiple copies there's an alternative method that's worth thinking about.

Get a matched drill and hole cutter set (Famag, the German company, make superb examples in 10mm and 12mm which are the two sizes I mainly use),
Shaker-Pulls-7.jpg


Use the hole cutter to make identical blanks,
Shaker-Pulls-1.jpg

Shaker-Pulls-2.jpg


Free the "stalk" of the blanks on a bandsaw,
Shaker-Pulls-5.jpg

Shaker-Pulls-6.jpg


Turn the drawer pull (I pop them in a three drawer drill chuck used on the lathe with no tail stock) and then press it home with an F Cramp and a bridging block at the back,
Buttons-&-Pull-03.jpg


With good quality tooling like Famag you get a reliable and consistent interference fit. I've done hundreds of these in dozens of timbers over many years, and I've yet to have a single example of a drawer pull ever coming loose.
Shaker-Pulls-10.jpg
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By Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz)
#1234317
When I attached the metal knobs (too large and not right ... ugh!), I was swayed by Lynndy, who said to place the knobs square to the drawer front, since she liked the idea of them fanning from the front of the chest and accentuating the curve. In practice, this was not a good idea. Opening the drawers felt wierd - one is used to a drawer opening in the directing of the pull. These drawers did not do so. The opened at an angle to the pull. It felt wierd. Lynndy thought it charming. She is wierd.

Having turned new Black Walnut knobs to match the drawer fronts, against the advice of some who argued for dark, perhaps Ebony knobs, I know had to decide how I would fit them. As before? No, I did not want that. I wanted to set the square to the drawer recess.

There were two issues here: how to drill them the same as each other.? It would look a mess if some varied out of line. And then there was the fact that the drawer fronts curves and angled, which meant that the knobs would go in at an angle. One side would sit in- and the other side proud of the surface.

I designed a couple of jigs to drill accurately. Fortunately I did not waste time making them ( I have no time in the kitty to get this piece ready for the upcoming West Australian Woodshow. It is days away). The simplest solution occurred to me last night. Use the drill press. Duh!

All that was needed was to ensure the drawer was held vertically, and then use progressively larger bits until the size I needed (3/8"), the tenon of the knob.

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That went smoothly.

The holes were then widened slightly on one side with a step drill bit to allow to seat the knobs evenly.

I have begun installing the knobs with wedges. The cabinet and drawer fronts have had a coat of Livos oil, and you can now get an idea of how the knobs blend in (the drawers are proud of the cabinet as the oil is drying)

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I completed the base for the chest this afternoon, but I am not thrilled with the design. I'll make a decision tomorrow whether to use it or not.

Regards from Perth

Derek
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By thetyreman
#1234402
now I can see the wood handles they are much better, you must have a god like amount of patience to make that many drawers, amazing work.
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By Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz)
#1234700
FINAL

Talk about down to the wire. It's 11 p.m. and I've just completed a coat of Howard's wax after the last coat of Livos Universal Wood Oil. The drawers were all finished inside and out with Ubeaut Hard Shellac (dewaxed blond shellac). The inside of the chest (drawer recesses) was given a coat of paste wax. Tomorrow morning I take the chest to the Perth Showground for the annual West Australian Wood Show, where it will take its place among others in the furniture competition. I started this piece 3 months ago.

I could tell you how the base gave me fits. It was a difficult task to design a stand for a curved cabinet. Probably why Krenov never built an apothecary chest! :) Last night I completed the base, and Lynndy loved it. Compound curves forever. Damn sexy. The base, that is.

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But when I placed the chest on it, the combination looked awful ... top heavy ... ugh! I was out of wood, out of time, and it looked like I was out of the competition.

This morning I woke up and had an inspiration. Cut the legs shorter. This evening, after work, I did just that. And I like the finished piece. I think the balance is right. So does Lynndy, which matters. The dimensions are 1000 high (39") x 460mm (18") across.

Here is the chest, and where it will be positioned in the entrance hall ...

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A few pics of the base ...

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Much time was spent designing and building the drawers, which curve across the fronts ...

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Yes, I changed the steel for brass screws (no slotted ones the correct size, however) ...

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And made knobs in the same Black Walnut, and fitted coplanar to the drawer recess (that was a headache before finally coming up with the simplest solution, to use the drill press!) ..

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I was very pleased with the drawer stops ...

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... and you can see the shiplapped back if you peak ...

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It has been a long, but exhilarating build. I hope that you got something from it too.

Regards from Perth

Derek
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By AndyT
#1234708
Astoundingly good work.
I've no idea what the other entries will be but this has to win.
Good call on the cut-down stand too.
Thanks for taking us along on the journey!
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By StraightOffTheArk
#1234718
I've really enjoyed following your work, very impressive as ever, while somehow making such high standards seem more achievable rather than out of reach, very inspirational.

Tara a bit,

SOTA