Moderators: Random Orbital Bob, nev, CHJ, Noel, Charley

 Reply
User avatar
By Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz)
#1230136
Here are a few more videos to illustrate some of the strategies that were used. These precede the video presented earlier:

Rebating the pin board ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rft-mY_4JL0

Preparing the sockets ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WnCX08 ... e=youtu.be

Clearing the sockets ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUFUGYsG-t0


Regards from Perth

Derek
User avatar
By Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz)
#1231042
Having completed the dovetailing of the drawer sides into the drawer fronts, the next step is to shape the outside bow to match the chest.

This is the drawer to be demonstrated ...

Image

The drawer blade has been removed, and receives a final tweaking to match a template. Every drawer blade receives the same treatment, and there is a template for each vertical row ...

Image

The drawer blade is returned to the chest, the drawer is fitted, and the profile of the drawer front is traced ...

Image

Below, the markings may be seen on the drawer front ...

Image

The drawer is pulled apart. The grooves for the drawer bottom have been completed. The drawer sides received a 3mm deep groove, while the groove for the drawer front is about 8-9mm deep. The extra depth here is to allow for the inner curve to be later shaped, and that this will remove approximately 3-4mm at the centre.

Image

Now the end of the drawer front is marked ...

Image

Blue tape is added, and the excess removed ...

Image

The tape is added to the upper and lower faces, and the template (from the drawer blade) is now used to mark the curve ...

Image

Once removed, the cut lines stand out clearly ...

Image

Image

The rasping may begin. A start is made with a Shinto, which has roughly 10 grain on the coarse side (this is a Japanese rasp made from hacksaw blades. The other side is about 14 grain).

Image

In turn, after the 10 grain comes the fine side of the Shinto, and then a 13 grain Auriou followed by a second cut file.

The surface is refined with a scraper ...

Image

... and 120/22/320 Abranet mesh. You will ask why sand after scraping? The reason is that the sanding removes any scratches left by the rasps and scraper, creating a uniform surface. The final result is fairly polished. It is possible that I may go over this with a cabinet scraper prior to finish ...

Image

This completes the drawer at this stage. The rear of the drawer front will next receive a complimentary curve. I hope to get to this during the week ...

Image

Image

The run out from cutting away the ends of the boards is noticeable (to me at any rate) ...

Image

Regards from Perth

Derek
By memzey
#1231052
Incredible work Derek, as ever. Are you not tempted to square the dovetails at the back or have I misunderstood?
By dzj
#1231054
I think if you were ever enamored with DTs, that 'love done gone cold' by now. :)
By memzey
#1231097
Sorry Derek my misunderstanding ; It’s where you stated that “The rear of the drawer front will next receive a complimentary curve”. For some reason I read that as referring to the back of the drawers but, on second reading, that’s clearly not the case. As you were and awesome work!
User avatar
By custard
#1231341
Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz) wrote:The surface is refined with a scraper ...
... and 120/22/320 Abranet mesh. You will ask why sand after scraping? The reason is that the sanding removes any scratches left by the rasps and scraper, creating a uniform surface. The final result is fairly polished. It is possible that I may go over this with a cabinet scraper prior to finish ...


Just a thought Derek. The curved shape of the front means there's greater exposure of the end grain out towards the edges. Depending on the finish this may result in the cabinet looking lighter in the centre and darker at the sides. One simple way of achieving a more uniform result across both end grain and long grain is simply to sand to much higher grits, say P2000 or even higher.
By Hornbeam
#1231597
I have really enjoyed reading this article. I think it shows just how much craftmanship is involved in a fairly small piece of furniture and how introducing curves make even the relatively simple so much more complicated, thought provoking and time consuming. Fanmtastic
Ian
User avatar
By Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz)
#1231602
Ian, Custard made a comment a few years ago, when I was building a chest with bow fronts and flared sides (essentially, a modern bombe). He noted that it takes at least 3 times longer to build anything with a curve. I would say that this is true, and even possibly an under-estimation.

Regards from Perth

Derek
User avatar
By Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz)
#1231818
Shaping the curved faces of the drawers was a lot of work, and I was very pleased to see it done. Dusty and dirty.Not fun. Now the inside faces need to be done, and this will complete the the third stage of building the drawers (the first stage was to fit parallelogram-shaped drawer fronts into their recesses, and the second stage was dovetailing the fronts).

The drawer front shaped on the outside only ...

Image

Blue tape (what else! :) ) is added to upper and lower edges ...

Image

The inside curve is scribed ...

Image

Image

Pulled apart, the rear of the drawer front is chamfered with a round bottomed spokeshave to prevent spelching ...

Image

The waste is removed with rasps - this is an Auriou 10 grain ...

Image

Three rasps in all are used to remove and smooth, ending with this 15 grain ..

Image

The surface is refined and finished with a scraper ..

Image

Final shots of the completed drawer front ...

Image

Image

Regards from Perth

Derek
User avatar
By AndyT
#1231877
I'm still enjoying watching the huge amount of patient, well planned work going into this project.
I like the purity of following the curve on the insides of the drawers. Was this always done, historically, or were insides left square?
User avatar
By marcros
#1231913
Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz) wrote:
The surface is refined and finished with a scraper ..

Image



Derek

That is a different scraper to those that I have seen before. I have seen card scrapers, and scraper planes. What is this one, please?

Mark
User avatar
By Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz)
#1232137
Mark, I made this from the rear of a 3/16" thick O1 plane blade. The sides are hollow ground on a bench grinder. The result is a fine burr/hook. It is the most stupendous scraper you can imagine. I have posted about it before.

Regards from Perth

Derek
User avatar
By Derek Cohen (Perth, Oz)
#1232138
This is a long post, and so feel free to skim through it. Who needs another dovetailing documentary?

This one is specific to the back of a drawer, and so is different from the through dovetails which one might use on boxes. Also, I have a few techniques to share, ones that I do not see mentioned much, if at all.

The drawer is one in the Apothecary chest. What has been shown before was the dovetailing hijinks needed for the curved fronts. This affects the drawer sides as well, since they are not equal in length. In fact, the length for the sides need to be measured individually.

Here is a drawer front with sides ...

Image

It is fitted in the recess and positioned carefully (top right hand drawer) ...

Image

At the rear of the chest, the drawer sides are clamped to avoid any movement ...

Image

Now the drawer side length can be marked. The final length is 10mm in from the back of the recess.

We are ready to begin joining the rear of the drawer. A drawer back has been added to the parts ...

Image

"Drop" (the gauge) for the width of the drawer back and transfer it to the ends of the drawer sides ...

Image

Now do the same for the drawer sides and transfer this to the drawer back ...

Image

With 24 drawers, it was quicker and easier to make up a template for positioning the tails ...

Image

Note that the tail alongside the groove (for the drawer bottom) is not a triangle, but one side is vertical (flanking the groove) ...

Image

Saw both drawer sides ...

Image

Time to remove the waste from the tails. First, create a chisel wall for all the tails ...

Image

Fretsaw the waste to 1-2mm from the line ...

Image

Remove the waste in thin layers for the cleanest finish. Note that the Tasmanian Oak is too thin (6.5m) to confidently pare half way by hand (better to use a hammer for precision). By taking very fine layers it is possible to push through the board without spelching the other side ...

Image

Blue tape on everything!! The drawer sides have blue tape ala the #140 trick (I wrote this up recently on my website). There are 4 layers. The drawer back has tape to aid in transferring marks (don't knock it if your eyesight is better than mine).

Image

Transfer the tails to the pin board ...

Image

The great thing about the blue tape method is that you only need one knife stroke to cut through. No sawing away to make an impression in the end grain. Saw against the tape. Go for it!

Image

Now remove the waste with a fretsaw. Again, aim for about 1mm above the line. For control, hold the saw handle very gently, and saw as lightly as you can - do not force the cut. Let the saw do the work. You will be rewarded with a straight line ...

Image

I saw away the ends about 1mm above the line ...

Image

In years past, I used to saw to the line. I now see more value in paring to the line. What you will notice is the chisel wall around the section. I am reminded of David Charlesworth's method of removing end waste. He calls his process "tenting". In this he pares upward, reducing the waste all the time. In my method, this is unnecessary since the chisel wall protects the sides and you can see when you are getting close to level ...

Image

Of all the aspects in through dovetailing, I think that removing the waste between the pins is the hardest. This is again where I was reminded of David's tenting method (but which he does not use in this section, only at the ends).

Again the chisel wall aides in enabling the chisel to register against the line without any danger of going over it. The chisel here is PM HSS, and very tough (and sharp!). The blade is driven at an angle away from the sides ...

Image

Turning the board over, and repeating the manoeuvre, the result is a tent ...

Image

I have two methods for removing the remaining waste. The first is to pare the tent, slowly reducing the angle. Since you are paring upwards, there is now danger to spelching the opposite side of the board ...

Image

The second is a side-to-side sweep, which slices away the waste ...

Image

Image

Finished ...

Image

The parts are now assembled. From the top ....

Image

... and the bottom ...

Image

Fitting the drawer ...

Image

Image

My plan is to set the drawers back a mm or two ...

Image

Any thoughts about this?

Regards from Perth

Derek