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By John Brown
#1250612
I have a set of three shifters, but the problem I always have is that the open up slightly each time you move them, and I have some long-term mental block about which way to turn the worm to close the mouth. I guess if I had a locking adjustable it would get more use. My favourite spanners are the ratcheting ring spanners. I remember years ago a chap I worked with had some open ended spanners which were somehow shorter on one side of the mouth, and shaped so that you could effectively "ratchet" them. Anyone know what I'm talking about?
By pcb1962
#1250619
John Brown wrote: I remember years ago a chap I worked with had some open ended spanners which were somehow shorter on one side of the mouth, and shaped so that you could effectively "ratchet" them. Anyone know what I'm talking about?

Something like this?
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By Tasky
#1250657
Rhyolith wrote:It seems to me the only people who strip nuts with adjustables are ametures (i.e. people who don’t know how to use them). Indeed for a newbie its just as easy to strip a nut with a fixed spanner that does not quite fit, I have actsully seen this more often than misuse of an adjustable.

For a lot of people, there are too many variables with an adjustable. Cheap brand, defective spanner, not quite lining it up square with the bolt face when tightening, not noticing it's slipped loose... these and more all lead to slippages, strippages and so forth, even in experienced (or just old and tired) hands.

I tend to find adjustables slip a lot around dirty, or oily engines, for obvious reasons... and the reason it's with me is because it's blown something or generally been neglected and gotten covered in oil in the first place.
We do still have adjustables, mole grips, stilsons and the like, especially the Stubby kind, but there are usually better options for much of what we do. But then, we have huge great chests full of tools, many of which are vehicle-specific, so carrying multi-purpose tools isn't much of a requirement.

John Brown wrote:I have a set of three shifters, but the problem I always have is that the open up slightly each time you move them

Usually only cheap ones do that...usually.

John Brown wrote:I remember years ago a chap I worked with had some open ended spanners which were somehow shorter on one side of the mouth, and shaped so that you could effectively "ratchet" them. Anyone know what I'm talking about?

We have some with semi-circular cutouts inside one jaw that work the same way.
Both tend to need enough 'swing' room to ratchet, though, else they're flippin' useless.
By worn thumbs
#1250708
A man I know,who spent several years wielding spanners in a racing environment,once told me that it wasn't a good idea to admit to owning an adjustable spanner.Things may have changed since then.
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By Trevanion
#1250713
John Brown wrote:I remember years ago a chap I worked with had some open ended spanners which were somehow shorter on one side of the mouth, and shaped so that you could effectively "ratchet" them. Anyone know what I'm talking about?


I've got a full set of these, Mine are old Ex-MOD Facom 40R "Speed" Spanners

(Not my picture, stole it from online)
Image

They work the same as any other spanner really, It's just you can do a return stroke with the spanner without taking it off the nut just like the modern ratcheted one that pcb1962 showed.
By AES
#1250758
Interesting that over the Pond you use the term "graunch". Is that common over there, or "just" an aero term (it's very common over here in aviation but I think I've heard it elsewhere)?
By Cheshirechappie
#1250759
My suspicion is that many of the objections to adjustable spanners go back to the days of tools like this;

https://img0.etsystatic.com/111/0/12655 ... 0_aemv.jpg

- made from steels that wore quickly, and with sufficient slop in the mechanism to develop out-of-parallel jaws and a complete inability to hold a pair of flats on a nut or bolt closely. In that case, objection is justifiable for any but the roughest work.

Nowadays, we have much better-made tools, such as this;

https://media.rs-online.com/t_large/F0539520-01.jpg

- which will take a surprising amount of use and abuse and still work well. I speak from experience - my 12" shifter has done about 30 years of sometimes rather hard service, and is still in very good order. I once saw a Bahco 18" adjustable with eight feet of scaffolding tube and a large bloke swinging his full weight on it; it never even grumbled - just took it, and was ready for more. Didn't damage the nuts, either (the job's or the bloke's).
By Inspector
#1250834
AES wrote:Interesting that over the Pond you use the term "graunch". Is that common over there, or "just" an aero term (it's very common over here in aviation but I think I've heard it elsewhere)?


No it isn't a common term. I went to vocational school to be a aircraft mechanic and had a couple Brit instructors trying to pound (hammer) (hammer) good practices into us. They referred to us as a bunch of graunch artists a lot. (homer) (homer) (homer) (homer) (homer) (homer) (homer)

When I was actually working I realized t'umb wrenchs (a Newfie taught me that one) weren't the worst tool to use on nuts and bolts. It was the slip joint pliers that a Chinese guy loved to use. We took those away from him.

Pete
By AES
#1250837
OK Inspector, interesting. Seems "we" not only exported know-how but slang too at one stage.

I did my aircraft engineering apprenticeship in the RAF which is where I first heard "graunch". With us though it was "graunch merchants" rather than "graunch artists" - in just the same way I knew several blokes who referred to commercial engine overhaulers who were maybe, shall we say "somewhat suspect" (!) as "puffin wash Johnnies" - but that was referring to "big round 'uns" of course, rather than today's fuel to noise converters. :D
By Inspector
#1250839
I worked on the big round 'uns myself with a firebombing company, so chased a lot of oil leaks on Pratt & Whitney and Wright engines in the Douglas A-26, Douglas DC-6, Grumman TBM and Trackers.
By AES
#1250844
Ahhhhhhhhhhh, Pratt 1830s, those was the days (along with those "abortionated" sleeve-valved Hercs and Centaurii)! The little Pratts (was it 1340s?) in the Beavers were good though, along with the Alvis Leonides - which I guess you didn't have in the US? (Percival Prince/Pembroke and Scottish Aviation Twin Pioneer, among others).

Thread drift folks, sorry. Back to graunching. :D
By Inspector
#1250846
Only worked on the P&W-1830 on a stand and R-1340 (Harvard) in school. P&W-R2800 in the A-26 and DC-6. The Wrights were R-2600 and R-1820.
Pete
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