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How-To’s

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Reverse Glue Joint Setup Guide

To set this bit up I’ve taken two pieces of 20mm Pine and marked one ‘A’ and the other ‘B’


Next, on one of the pieces, I marked a centre line (right->).

You are trying to set the centre of the bit with the centre line on your board. This is hard to do, so just get as close as you can.

I’m setting the fence so that the bottom cutter is level with it.

You must make sure you turn your router speed to a low speed, CMT recommend 18,000 rpm for this bit.

Run ‘A’ through first (faceup).

And then run ‘B’ through (face down).


Here’s the first result. Its hard to see but ‘A’ is slightly higher than ‘B’. To get it right I have to higher the bit ever so slightly (This is where the fine height adjustment comes in handy on the router).

If ‘A’ was lower then ‘B’ you would lower the bit. It works out you higher or lower the bit about half the distance of the error.



Here’s the first result. Its hard to see but ‘A’ is slightly higher than ‘B’. To get it right I have to higher the bit...

Drawer Lock Bit Setup Guide

The drawer lock bit from CMT, is really easy to set up.

Start by taking two bits of scrap wood – the same thickness as the wood you are using for the drawers – and mark one A and the other B.



In this example I’m using 20mm thick pine. On one of the pieces of wood I’ve marked two lines – one 6mm up and the other 12mm up.

Install the router cutter into your router table, using the marks as a guide. I’m setting the top of the cutter to the top mark (12mm) and to make sure I’ve got it in the right place, the bottom mark should be lined up with the mid point of the cutter.

I had no idea on what depth to set the fence at, so I just guessed….

You must make sure you turn your router speed to a low speed, CMT recommend 18,000 rpm for this bit.


With the speed on my router turned down to 18,00rpm I’m running ‘A’ through first face-up.

Next, I’m running ‘B’ through face against the fence using two push blocks to aid me.

Well here you can see the result, it’s pretty much perfect...

Halflap Joint

The tools you need are:-

1. Tenon Saw
2. Try Square
3. Marking Gauge
4. Pencil

Take one of the pieces to be joined (A) and lay it down flat on your workbench, then take the mating piece(B) and lay it on top in the opposite direction, making sure the edge of piece (A) is flush with the end of piece (B) (as shown on the left <- ).

With a pencil, mark the width of the timber onto piece (A) using the mating piece (B) as a guide.



Remove the mating piece(B) and put it to one side.

With a try square follow the line you’ve just drawn, all the way round the piece of wood (A).

Repeat this with the mating piece (B).



Set your marking gauge to half the thickness of your wood.

Gouge a line on both edges from the line to the end of the wood. Also gouge a line on the top of the pieces (the end grain)



As I said before "A good tip so you don’t go passed the line is to put a small indentation just before the line using your marking gauge – so when you gouge the line, the pin on the...

Halving Joint

For a ‘halving joint’ the tools you will need are:-
1. Tenon Saw
2. Marking Gauge
3. Try Square
4. Sharp Bevel Edge Chisel
5. Pencil
6. Stanley Knife
7. Ruler/Tape Measure
8. Hammer/Wooden Mallet

This halving joint is very strong, stronger then tenons or dowels. The two pieces to be joined are the same thickness and width.



Step1:- Marking Out!

First, take your try square and pencil and mark the face and edges as shown in the picture to the right:-

The distance between the lines is the width of the mating piece.


Next you need to find out half the thickness of your timber by dividing the total thickness by 2. After you have this you need to set your marking gauge to it. (right ->)

You now need to use your marking gauge and gouge a ‘halfway’ line between the two lines on both edges. A good tip so you don’t go passed the line is to, put a small indentation just before the line using your marking gauge – so when you gouge the line, the pin on the marking gauge should fall...
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