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PostPosted: 19 May 2007, 17:48 
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Probably a numpty question, but aren't they all when you're a newbie?

I'm making up some simple square section balusters from salvaged sections of old pine, and I want to put stopped chamfers on them. I've experimented using a 45deg chamfer bit in a router table, and the problem I get is a manky finish at the end of the cut. I've tried sliding the workpiece away horizontally, lifting it off the cutter, and backing up slightly before removing it, but I can't get a clean finish.

So, is it:
1 The bit - seems sharp but has been used on laminate faced ply.
2 My technique - what should I be doing?
3 Asking the impossible - there's no way to get a clean finish at the stop with a router.

I've got at least 50 spindles to make, so I don't fancy having to use a chisel to clean up 200 cuts..... :roll: Any help much appreciated.


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PostPosted: 19 May 2007, 18:17 
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Make-up a couple of end stop jigs to clamp to the workpiece if possible. When you get to the end of the cut and the router is against the end stop, move the router to the right to remove the cutter from the work. The other end may need a small amount of climb milling to achieve the complete cut

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PostPosted: 19 May 2007, 18:23 
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What do you mean by a manky finish? Is it burning the wood, chatter marks, tear out etc?

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PostPosted: 19 May 2007, 19:20 
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Thanks for the tip, Scrit.

The "manky" finish seems to be like an incomplete cut - still wood fibres left to remove. Pulling them off results in tearing - does that make any sense? The start of the cut is clean, which I'd expect.


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PostPosted: 19 May 2007, 19:38 
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cumbrian, I think this is because the cutter cuts into the wood when it starts, and as the cutter moves through 180degs its cutting out of the wood (a bit like planing off the end of end grain).

This is an educated guess but try routing to the middle then turn the wood over and rout to the middle again overlapping the cut. Hope I've explained properly.

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PostPosted: 19 May 2007, 21:12 
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Shultzy wrote:
try routing to the middle then turn the wood over and rout to the middle again overlapping the cut. Hope I've explained properly.


That makes sense, but unless I've got it wrong that means running a cut with the workpiece between the cutter and the fence - is that a no-no? Or do I just make up a temporary fence and clamp it on the other side of the cutter?


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PostPosted: 19 May 2007, 21:14 
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Make sure the cutter is closely supported by the fence so breakout doesn't occur. Regards Andy


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PostPosted: 19 May 2007, 21:53 
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Hi there are you sure you are going in the right direction.
Phil.


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PostPosted: 19 May 2007, 22:04 
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cumbrian, don't run the wood between the cutter and the fence, I think thats a climb cut. If its square section, rout left of cutter, first half. Looking from the top turn wood 180degs anticlockwise. Looking at the end turn wood 90degs anticlockwise. Rout left of cutter, second half. Hope this helps.

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PostPosted: 20 May 2007, 06:39 
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I have cut chamferss with the timber in a vice and cut using the router in hand. Stops are clampled to limit the cut.
I find there is more control over the router this way.


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PostPosted: 20 May 2007, 10:47 
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Shultzy wrote:
If its square section, rout left of cutter, first half. Looking from the top turn wood 180degs anticlockwise. Looking at the end turn wood 90degs anticlockwise. Rout left of cutter, second half. Hope this helps.


Doh! ](*,) That'll teach me to try and do three dimensional geometry in my head in the evening after half a bottle of Rioja! Providing I get everything set up accurately, that'll work - it presents a different face to the cutter, but because it's a 45 deg chamfer, that's okay. Not only that. it should make it easier to set repeat stops up without having to fit some sort of outrigger to the table to cater for the full length of the spindle.

Thanks. Maybe I'll be allowed some time to try it out later.........


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PostPosted: 20 May 2007, 16:47 
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One thing you need to remember when routing stopped chamfers is that the ends of each side are not symmetrical. One side of the chamfer is swept out rather more than the other. This bothers some people. Like me.

So you could make a little jig which fits over the edge of the spindle, which presents chisel at 45 deg. You can then just trim the ends so that they look just like a trad one as both sides of the chamfer will be stopped in the same way.

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PostPosted: 20 May 2007, 16:52 
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Steve, is that why in the past I did my chamfers with the router by hand and got symetricals and not on the table?


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PostPosted: 22 May 2007, 16:05 
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Continuing the stopped chamfer saga, here's a few pix of what's been going on:

Initial attempt across the router table, leaves waste to be removed and then cleaned up

Image

Nice shiny new CMT cutter, same thing!

Image

Now rout halfway, turn the piece 180 and 90 and here's the result - which looks cleaner in reality than in the picture


Image

And as both ends are now the start of a cut, they're symmetrical; job done! Now to get off the practice scraps and onto the real thing.


Image


Image


Many thanks for all the help. Any and all further tips gratefully received!


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PostPosted: 22 May 2007, 16:43 
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I found that when cutting a chamfer in oak where I stopped moving the router at the end of the chamfer the oak was prone to burn, so I used this method in the pic to lift the router away from the work piece, this could work for your problem too.
Image

The yellow coloured wedge piece is clamped to your work piece where you want the chamfer to end.

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